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RUTLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY 


World War 11 1940s 


RUTLAND HERALD photos 
Military Service, Weddings, 


Searchable PDF format 


Misc . 


SCANNED 9-2015 




UTLAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 26, 1942 


Herald Photo. 

A1 It was the last tiling he said before he went overseas: ‘Be 
and have a Christmas tree this year, Mom!' j ’ Bespile the fact 
that some of her children had been sick and others away from 
home working, Mrs, William Conway of 6 Cleveland avenue was 
determined to keep faith with her son, and have a gaily-lighted 
Christmas tree this year as in the past. She is shown placing 
picture of her son, Pvt. Arthur Conway, 29, beside the tree white 
two of her daughters aid in decorating the traditional symbol of 
Christmas. Pvt, Conway is an ambulance driver in an Army 
Medical corps unit, and is now believed to be in service on the 
North African front. His sisters decorating the tree are Mrs, Wil¬ 
liam Diniick of West street and Adeline, IS, Mr, and Mrs. Con¬ 
way have four sons and three daughters. 











AND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 16, 1 


Merritt Thonm Adams of Rutland and bis bride, the former 
Lucy Aline Ellery of Akron, G* f are shown (center! with their 
attendants following their wedding, which took place September £& 
in Akron, At left is Sgt. Thomas R, Adams, brother of the bride¬ 
groom, who was best man, and at right is Miss Lillias Mae Ellery, 
bridesmaid, sister of the bride. The couple now make their home 
at 3&8 North Main street, Rutland. 




















[TLAND DAILY HERALD, 



S/Sft. and Mrs, Lawrence 
Benedict, who were recently 
married at Chimney Mock, N.C^ 
have been spending their honey¬ 
moon at Lake Lure, N. C., and 
Atlantic City, N. J. S/SgL Ben¬ 
edict is the son of Mr, and Mrs. 
*L S. Benedict of Killing ton ave¬ 
nue* Mrs, Benedict is the for¬ 
mer Miss Shirley Hageman of 
Lincoln, Neb. 












RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, SA7 



Pfc. Harold L» Brock of Syracuse, N, T„ and Miss Kathryn E. 
sldine^j£T21 Barrinrton avenue, whose engagement has just 


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The engagement of Miss June Anketeil of New Haven, Conn., 
and Capt. Donald L. Buck, U. S. A*, son of Mr. and Mrs* R, C. Buck 
of tke Cold Elver road, was recently announced by the prospective 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Norton Anketeil of New 
Haven. Miss Anketeil is a secretary In the Bureau of Internal 
Ee venue in New Haven, and is a descendant of Thomas Gregson, 
one of the founders of that city, Capt, Buck graduated from Rut¬ 
land High school in 1929 and from Rensselaer Polytechnic institute, 
Rensselaer, N. Y„ in 1933, In 1940 he enlisted as a second lieutenant 
in the Army and was sent to Fort Bel voir, Va. At present he is 
at the desert training station, Rice, Cal* The wedding will take 
^hlace during the Christmas holidays. 


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RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 

- Jfc. 
















fcT. 


MissM.E. Canty 
[Bride of Resident 
| Of Schenectady 


An autumn wedding was solem¬ 
nized yesterday morning at B o’clock 
at the Church of Christ the King 
when Miss Marguerite Elizabeth 
Canty of South Main street, daugh¬ 
ter of the late Mr. and Mrs, Patrick 
J. Canty, became the bride of 
Michael J. Johnston of Schenec¬ 
tady, N. Y 4T snn of Roderick D. 
Johnston of Dominion, Novia Scotia. 

The single ring service was per¬ 
formed during the nuptial mass by 
the Rev. J, M. Kennedy, pastor. 
White gladiolas and white pompom 
chrysanthemums decorated the 
altar. 

A musical program was given by 
Miss Catherine Clifford, organist 
and George Videll, soloist. 

The bride was gowned in white 
Chantilly lace over white satin. Her 
shoulder length veil fell from a 
lace cap trimmed with small white 
ostrich tips. She carried a shower 
bouquet of white roses, sweet peas 
and swansonia. Mrs. William Carr 
of this city, who attended her sister 
as matron of honor, wore a gown 
of hyacinth faille taffeta, with 
matching accessories, and she car¬ 
ried an arm bouquet of American 
Beauty roses. 

William Carr, brother-in-law of 
the bride, was best man. The ush ers 
were Robert C, Canty of New York, 
brother of the bride and Richard C. 
Capeless of Schenectady, N, Y, 

A wedding breakfast for 50 guests, 
including immediate relatives and 
close friends, was served at the 
Hotel Berwick. The bride's table 
was decorated in yellow roses and 
white pompom chrysanthemums 
and a large wedding cake formed 
the centerpiece. A reception fol¬ 
lowed at the bride's home. 

After a wedding trip to New 
York, the couple will make their 
home alter November 1 in Schenec¬ 
tady, N. Y,, where Mr. Johnston 
is employed by the General Elec¬ 
tric company. The bride has been 
a member of the staff of the time¬ 
keeper’s office at the Rutland rail¬ 
road. 

Out-of-town guests included Mr, 
and Mrs, E. C. Capeless, Patricia 
and Richard Capeless of Schenec¬ 
tady, N. Y,; Mr. and Mrs. John 
Spanbauer and daughter, Theresa 
of Brighton, Mass.: Miss Sue Clark 
of Pittsford; Mrs. James J, McGuirk 
of East Wallingford; Miss Helen 
Franzoni of Windsor, Conn., Mrs. 
Howard Williams of Montpelier and 
Mrs. Harold Mooney of Walling¬ 
ford. 







Emily Marie Cantone 
And Sgt. f. E. Donahue 
Married at St. Peter’s I 


Miss Emily Marie Cant-one, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
A. Cantone of Traverse place, and 
Sgt. John E. Donahue of the United 
States Army Air force, son of Mr. 
and Mrs* George W, Donahue of 
Washington street, were married 
yesterday morning at Si Peter’s 
church. The Bev, Michael Demasi 
performed the double ring cere¬ 
mony during a nuptial mass before 
an altar hanked with summer flow¬ 
ers and ferns. 

The bride, who was given in mar¬ 
riage by her father, wore a gown 
of white satin and net and a veil 
which fell from a tiara of seed 
pearls. She carried a shower bou¬ 
quet of white roses and sweet peas* 
Mrs* Clement Aibatiell, sister of the 
bride, was the matron of honor and 
wore a gown of aquamarine silk 
jersey. Her head-dress and bouquet 
were of American Beauty roses. 

The bride’s mother wore a black 
sheer dress with matching acces¬ 
sories and the bridegroom’s mother 
was dressed in light blue crepe 
with Navy accessories. Both wore 
corsages of red roses and sweet 
peas* 

George W. Donahue; jr., of Al¬ 
bany, N. Y,, brother of the bride¬ 
groom, was best man. Edward IB* 
Donahue and Charles E, McClallen 
were ushers* 

The (bridegroom’s gift to the bride 
was a sterling silver compact and 
be presented the best man with a 
gold cigarette case. The ushers re¬ 
ceived monogrammed tie clasp and 
pin sets. 

After the ceremony, a wedding 
breakfast and reception were held 
at the Fittsfond Inn for about 40 
immediate relatives. 

Sgt and Mrs. John E, Donahue 
are both graduates of Mount St. Jo¬ 
seph academy* Sgt Donahue Is on 
a 30-day furlough after 26 months 
of overseas duty with the Eighth 
Air force. Mrs, Donahue has been 
employed at. Milady’s Beauty shop. 

The couple left on a wedding trip 
to Montreal and the White moun¬ 
tains. 

Among the out-of-town guests at¬ 
tending the w'edding were; Mrs. 
H | yard Cobb and son, of Boston, 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Jenkins of 
Bellows Falls and Sgt. Harold J. 
Shortsleeve of Framingham, Mass. 









IDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 22, 1942, 


Mrs. Robert Carbonncau was 
Lvdia Joan Piscopo, daughter 
of Mr, and Mrs, Patsy Fiscopn 
of State street, before her mar¬ 
riage Monday morning in Si. 
Peter’s church to the son of Mr, 
and Mrs. Emile Carbonneau of 
Lincoln avenue. The couple left 
Rutland Monday, after a recep¬ 
tion at the home of the bride, 
for a wedding trip to Montreal. 











Blanche Chamberlanc 
Is Church Bride Here 
Of Lt. C. L. Hooten I 


Miss Blanche Elizabeth Chamber-1 
land, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Oc¬ 
tave G, E- Chamfaerland of 63 Elm 1 
street, was married Saturday at 
noon to Lieut. Clinton L. Hooten, 
<?on of Mr, and Mrs, J, H. Hooten 
of Travares, Fla, 

The Rev. Edward J, Gellneaul 
p erform ed the cerem ony in th e | 
Sacred Heart of Mary church be-| 
fore an altar banked with sprin L 
flowers. During the ceremony musiel 
was furnished by Mrs, W. W. Han- 1 
dall, organist. t 

The bride, who was given in mar* 
riage by her father, wore a floor 
length gown of white silk jersey 
with a short veil and carried a bou¬ 
quet of white roses, sweet peas and 
bouvardia, 

Mrs. Arba K, Alford, jr., of Mont¬ 
clair, N, X, sister of the bride, was 
the matron of honor and wore an 
aquamarine sheer gown with a hat 
of real marguerites, carrying a bon- 
quet of coral gerbera* yellow daisies 
and bouvardia, Earl Hooten of 
Lynn, Mass,, brother of the bride¬ 
groom, was the best man. 

The ushers included Maj, A, H, 
Miller of Bradley Field, Conn., and 
Lieut. Arba K. Alford, Montclair, 
N, X, Who is stationed in Norfolk, 
Va. 

A luncheon was served at the 
Rutland Country club following the 
ceremony for members of the bridal 
party, immediate families and 
friends. 

Mrs, Hooten graduated from Rut¬ 
land High school and the Colum¬ 
bia university School of Dental and 
Oral Hygiene, Following her grad¬ 
uation she was dental hygienist for 
the Travelers’ Insurance company 
in Hartford* Conn,, prior to receiv¬ 
ing an appointment as dental hygi¬ 
enist in the U, S, Civil Service at 
Bradley Field, Conn. 

Lieut. Hooten attended the Uni¬ 
versity of Florida and, majored in 
business administration. Prior to his 
entrance into the Army in 1941 
he was associated with his brother 
in the citrus industry. Lieut Hoo¬ 
ten was placed in the Finance de¬ 
partment when he entered the serv¬ 
ice and served with the Bth Air 
force during the Egyptian and Li¬ 
byan campaigns. He has just receiv¬ 
ed appointment as finance officer 
at Fort Dix, N„ J, 

After a wedding trip to Lake 
Congomond* Conn.* the young cou¬ 
ple will live at Fort Dix* N. J. 

Among those from out of town 
attending the ceremony were Dr, 
and Mrs, George A. Gosselin, John 
Gosselin, Miss Betsy Gosseliu and 
Mrs, Elizabeth Nelson of Hartford, 
Conn.; Mr, and Mr. Earl Hooten 
and daughter Leona of Lynn, Mass*; 
Mr, and Mrs, Robert C* John of 
Loudenville* N. Y.* and Mr. and 
Mrs. Kingsley Smith of Springfield, 


40 ATTE> 


W Eb 










Mrs. George I E, Chaltners, re¬ 
cent bride of Dt. Comdr. Chal¬ 
mers of the Navy Air service, is 
shown above. She is the former 
Dorothy Pell Schmitz of Brook¬ 
lyn, N. Y* Her husband is a son 
of Mr, and Mrs, Edward A. 
Chalmers of 23 Burnham ave¬ 
nue. 






1 



RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, MONDAY MORNING, MA 


Bachrach Photo. 

Miss Louise Jessica Smith of 
Boston (above), daughter of 
Mrs. Kaymond Richardson Beane 
of this city, was married Satur¬ 
day to Lieut. Junior Grade 
George Edward Chalmers, U. S. 
N. R., (right), son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Alexander Chal¬ 
mers of Burnham avenue. 


G. Chalmers 
Takes Bride! 


Navy Lieutenant, Rutland Man, I 
Weds Louise J. Smith, Bos-| 
ton; Other Nuptials. 

/ 

Beanehurst, home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Richardson Beane, was! 
the scene, at 8 o'clock Saturday 
night of the wedding of her daugh¬ 
ter, Miss Louise Jessica Smith of 
Boston, and Lieut. Junior Grade 
George Edward Chalmers, TJ. S, 
N. R„ son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Alexander Chalmers of 23 Burn¬ 
ham avenue. 

The Rev. J. Gravdon Brown of) 
the Congregational church per¬ 
formed the ceremony in a green 
bower arranged in the west win¬ 
dows of the living room which were 
flanked with tall vases of white 
calla lilies. Spring flowers, includ¬ 
ing daffodils, iris and snapdragons 1 
were arranged in vases about the 
rooms. The Olson trio played the 
wedding march and also provided 
music during the reception. 

The bride was on the arm of Mr. 
Beane, who gave her In marriage, 
as the wedding party entered the, 
section in the living room set aside 
by white satin ribbons for the im-| 
mediate families. The guest list In¬ 
cluded 55 close relatives and inti¬ 
mate friends. 

Worn by the bride was a gown 
white draped jersey, her tulle 
veil fell from a pearl coronet and 
she carried a bouquet of white 
orchids, sweet peas and freesias.il 
Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Diment]] 
of Syracuse, N. Y., classmate of the 
bride at Skidmore college and her 
maid of honor, was gowned In char¬ 
treuse jersey and carried Talisman 
roses, yellow snapdragons and Ber¬ 
ger daisies, 

Robert Chalmers, brother of the 
bridegroom, was best man. 

At the reception following the 
service, Mrs. Beane and Mrs. Chal¬ 
mers assisted in receiving, Mrs. 
Beane in a gown of heartbreak 
pink and Mrs. Chalmers in sea 
foam .green, and both wearing white 
gardenias. In the center of the 
bride's supper table was a large 
bride's cake topped with miniature 
bride and bridegroom, their cos¬ 
tumes being exact replicas of the 
gown worn by the bride and the 
navy uniform of Lieut. Chalmers. 
It was surrounded by smilax and 
sweet peas. To complete the effect 
were four eight-inch tapers and 
four old milk-glass vases filled with 
freesias. 

As she left, following the cere¬ 
mony, the bride wore a black dress 
with printed sprays of red and 
yellow poppies. Her accessories in¬ 
cluded a large red hat, shoes and 
bag, and a sable-dyed muskrat coat. 
A shoulder bouquet of orchids 
from the center of her bridal bou¬ 
quet topped her costume. 

Mrs. Chalmers was graduated 
from Rutland High school and from 
Skidmore college in the class of 
1940. She is a public health nurse 
in Community Health association 
in Boston. Lieut. Chalmers was 
graduated from Kent Hill Prepara¬ 
tory school in Maine and from the 
University of Richmond. He has 
recently been attached to the naval 
air station at Pensacola, Fla. 

































Miss Florence Florene Rcay, daughter of Mrs. Lina Reay of 
Las Vegas, Nev., will be married June 10 to Staff Sergt. Frederick 
A. Christmas, who is stationed at the Kingman Army Air base, 
Kingman, Ariz., and is the son of Francis E. Christmas of 80 Plain 
street. The couple is shown above. Sergt. Christmas was an 
aerial gunner and observer with a Flying Fortress crew which 
completed 50 active bombing missions and credited with sinking 
seven Jap ships and probably five more. He graduated from Rut¬ 
land High school and worked as an uslicr at local theaters before 
entering the University of Alabama which he attended before en¬ 
listing. He has received the Silver Star, the Air Medal, the Oak 
Leaf Cluster, a second Oak Leaf Cluster, the Distinguished Flying 
Cross and four unit citations from the president of the United 
States. 













WEDNESDAY MOR NING, JUNE 21, 1944 


I 


Elizabeth Harrington, 
S. J. Clarino Married 
In Church Ceremony 


Mjss Elizabeth J. Harrington 
youngest daughter of Ernest l! 
Harrington of Jackson avenue was 
married yesterday morning at 8:30 

hv th k n Ch T rch of Christ the King 
by the Rev. J. M. Kennedy, to Sal¬ 
vatore J. Clarino, son of Mr. and 
Mrs, Roger Clarino of Killington 
avenue. The single ring service was 

a gown of white 
aded satin, with a fingertip 
veil, and carried a bouquet of white 
roses and pink sweet peas The 
matron of honor, Mrs. Donald Har» 
Tin* ton of Portsmouth, N* H tf was 
attired m a gown of yellow'mar- 
quisette over taffeta and carn'ed 
an assorted bouquet. 

.. 1 ’ he / A W0 bridesmaids, Miss Chris- 

rwi*« lalJno and Miss Pati ence 
Clarino, wore pink and blue net 

over taffeta and carried colonial 
bouquets. The flower girls, Miss 
Eunice Fusco, niece of Mr. Clarino 
wore a gown of white organdy over 
green taffeta, and Miss Carroil Arm 
Kauner of Troy, N. Y„ had a gown 

?i,7 B te u.° rsan ,1 y over l avan der taf- 
ture bo°« 1 gWS Carried minia * 
James Clarino of Proctor, brother 
™ bridegroom, was the best 
man and the ushers were William 

ciaH^f tt 4 h nd u J ^ in An * aIon e, Mrs. 
^ianjio, the bridegroom's mother 

wore a navy blue dress with m2 
* accessories and had a corsage 
of red roses, 

* ™l°nu illg tbe Weddin £ ^remony, 
was held at the home 
or the biJdes father for about 125 
guests, pink and while decorations 
being used. 

When the couple return from 
he r wedding trip they will make 
ineii home on Franklin street. 

*J^!? 1 l fr0in ° ut of tow1 ^ who at- 
ceremony were Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Roscoe, Mrs. Ferlin 
Adams and Mrs, George Roscoe of 
Vergennes, Miss Francis Rock of 

BmwT J ? hn Hy ^ ek of West 

JF*- James Clarino of 

BurHn^ Chrlstine Clarino of 

Burlington Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 

” r fU' e 5„ and son. Raymond, of Pitts¬ 
field, Mr, and Mrs, Donald Har¬ 
rington and Raymond Gould of 

Frant^°T* N ‘ ,?'* Mr ‘ and Mrs. 
Frardv Mr, and Mrs. Ed¬ 

ward Raiche of Dauby and Mr, 
and^Mrs. Joseph Kauner of Troy, 





















"airman 



Ens. Herrmann 
BecomesBrideof 
Lt. Cummings 

/ C o 


Mr. and Mrs, H. H. Herrmann of 
Jackson avenue yesterday announc¬ 
ed the marriage of their daughter, 
Ensign Leyla Elizabeth, to Lieut 
Gerald Edward Cummings, USNIR 
son of Mr, and Mrs, Dennis P, 
mings of Salem, Mass. The cere^ 
Imony was performed January 23 at 
14 o clock in the afternoon in the 
I S. Naval Training station chapel 
I at Newport, R. L, by the Rev, Fath¬ 
er Laugh lin. 


















cii anil ounce a, are snown , 


Kathryn E. Considine, 
Syracuse Serviceman I 
Engaged to Be Wedl 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Considine| 
of 121 Harrington avenue have an¬ 
nounced the engagement of their I 
daughter, Kathryn E, Considine, to I 
Pfe. HaTOld L. Brock, son of Mr. I 
and Mrs. Lawrence T. Brock of 255 1 
Valley drive, Syracuse, N. Y, 

Miss Considine is a graduate of I 
Rutland High school, and is em-| 
ployed, as a supervisor in the traf¬ 
fic department of the Hew England] 
Telephone company in this city. 

Pfc. Brock, recently returned] 
from combat duty overseas, is a| 
graduate of the Onondaga Valley I 
High school, Syracuse, He enlisted I 
in the armed forces in January, 1942, 1 
and. sailed fof overseas in June,! 
1943. He took part in the invasions I 
of Sicily and. Italy. After a 21-day | 
furlough he has gone to Camp But- 
ner, N. C,, for assignment. 

No date has been set for the wed¬ 
ding. 









N< 


.AND DAILY HERALD, MONDAY MORNING 


Lieut. Thomas Aldrich Cooley, son of Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Cooley of South Main street and Miss Ellen Joy Manor, daughter 
of Mrs. Henrietta Willard Hastings 1 of San Antonio. Tex.* were 
married Saturday afternoon at the Post chapel, Kelley Field, Tex, 
The bride is a graduate of Scion academy and attended the tlni- 
rersity of Texas, Lieut. Cootey attended Norwich university and 
entered the Army as a Flying Cadet in June, 15)4!. He it an in¬ 
structor at the Advanced Flying school, Kelley Field. 










f 



RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Abort art S/Sgt. and Mrs. Lawrence J. Cour Celle, who were 
married in Fitisford on September 29* Mrs. Courcetle is the former 
Helen C. Lundrigau, daughter of Mr, and Mrs, John W, Lundrigan 
of Pittsford, and S/Sgt. Courcelle is a srtn of Mr, and Mrs, Adolphus 
A. Conrcelle of 15 Charles street, Rutland. 















Patricia J. Charron, 


Scrgt. A. Macfarlane 



Mr. and Mrs. Gelas Charron of 


Sheldon place have announced the 
marriage of their daughter, Miss 
Patricia J* Charron* to First Sergt* 
Albert Macfarlane of Wallingford* 
The ceremony took place in the post 
chapel at Camp Butner, N. <l f on 
November 14. The Bev. McDermott 
officiated at the double ring cere¬ 
mony* There was music played by 
Corp, Edward Collins* 

The bride wore a gown of white 
duchess satin and a fingertip veil. 
She carried a bouquet of white 
roses and swansonia. The matron 
of honor, Mrs* Glenn Slater, was 
dressed in sky blue brocaded satin 
md carried pink chrysanthemums 
ind snapdragons. 

A reception was held at the camp 
*uest house. Sergt. and Mrs. Mac- 
arlane are now residing in Dur- 
iam, N, C. 

Mrs, Macfarlane, who was gradu- 
ted from Mount St, Joseph aead- 
my, had been employed in Spring- 
eld. Her husband, a graduate of 
Wallingford High school, was em- 
loyed by the American Fork & 
foe company there. 









fo-ti-'HZ- 

HURSDAY MORNING, 


St?*T Sergt. and Mrs* Richard 
M. %;yr, formerly of Union 
street, this city, are shown 
above, Mrs, Cyr, the former 
Ann FrosEzo, has left for Chand¬ 
ler, Ariz,, to make her home 
temporarily with her husband, 
who is stationed at Williams 
field, in that city. 















Sgt, and Mis. John E. Donahue of Rutland, who were married 
Monday in St. Peter's church, are on their wedding trip to Canada. 
Mrs* Donahue, the former Miss Emily Cantone, is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Cantone of Traverse place, Sgt. Dona¬ 
hue is the son of Mr, and Mrs. George W. Donahue of Washington 
street. 










Corp< Carroll Lincoln and his bride, the former Janet Stratton 
of Rutland, shown above, were married Saturday in Ira. The 
bride is a daughter of Mrs. Clara Stratton of North street exten¬ 
sion. Corp. Lincoln is stationed at Wemlover Field, Utah. He is 
a son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lincoln of Ira. 














[Richard F. Fuller Weds 
Maine Girl in Augusta |j 

- Announcement has been made of 
Ithe marriage of RAJflS/c Richard F. 
I’uHer. son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
fuller of East street, and Miss Lu- 
iille A. Lynch, daughter of Mr., j 
ad Mrs, James H. Lynch of Angus-■ 
a Me. The ceremony was per- 
former July 3 by the Rev* Thomas 
} O’ Dowd at SL* Mary’s church rec* 
try in Augusta. The couple spent 1 
fVeral days at Hampton Beach in 
Simplon* N* H. 

I Fuller, who graduated from Rut¬ 
ted High school in 1942, is presen|- 
l stationed at the Naval Air station 
New Bedford. Mass., and expects 
l be transferred to Quonset, R. L 









DECEMBER 7, 1944. 


fanet E. McLellan 
Engaged to Marry 


Ens. R. W. Gid dings 


Mr. and Mrs. James McLellan 
i of Wallingford have announced the 
| engagement of their daughter, 
(Janet Ellen to Ensign Raymond 
W. Giddmgs, USNR, son of Mr. and 
Mm Raymond C Giddmgs of Pitts- 
ford, according to word received by 
Rutland friends. 


MISS JANET MXELLAN 

Ensign Giddings has recently re¬ 
ceived his commission and the | 
"Navy Wings of Gold 7 ' at the “An- 
|napolis of the Air" in Pensacola, | 
Fla. He is now stationed at a pre- 
operational base at Daytona Beach.] 
Fla. 

Miss McLellan graduated from I 
Rutland High school in the class! 
of 1942 and has since been employed | 
as a telephone operator here. En¬ 
sign Giddings graduated from Pitts- 
ford High school In the class of | 
1942, 

No dale has been set for thefl 
wedding. 

















Corp, Walter J* Guilfoy of the 
local Army ret railing and in¬ 
duction st a ft and Misi- Edna A„ 
Glynn of Dorchester, Mass., are 
to be married this morning in 
Boston. The couple are shown 
during a visit Miss Glynn made 
to Kuttand recently. Corp. 
Guilfoy, on dutj* here since 
August, is tn charge of aviation 
cadets* volunteer officer candi¬ 
dates and publicity* He was 
formerly employed in Washing¬ 
ton, After a short wedding trip 
the couple w ill make their home 
at 55 Elm street in this city. 









TLAND DAILY HERALD 


S/Sgi, Joseph A. LaPlante of 
Spruce street and his bride, 
the former Doreen Gill of 
Auckland, New Zealand, are 
shown above following their re¬ 
cent wedding in Auckland. 
Sgf. La PI ante, son of Mr, and 
Mrs. Amos LaPlante* left Rut¬ 
land with the Vermont Na¬ 
tional Guard and has been in 
the Pacific area lor 27 months. 
He was formerly employed by 
the Davis Feed company. 








P * ww H I '■ > < w 

/- j j, '/ *j£ 

RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Maj. and Mrs. Fritz R. Metzger, who were recently married 
in San Francisco following Maj. Metzger's return from the Pacific 
theater, are on a wedding trip through California. Mrs. Metzger 
is the former Miss Edna C. Eelihan of Rutland. 

























SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 27, 1944. 

pha M. Dorion 
To Be Wed in July 
To Pfc. J. J. Murphy! 


Mr. and Mrs, H. J. Dorion of 17 
Kingsley avenue have announced [ 
the forthcoming marriage of their 
daughter, Ziipha M. Dorion, to Pfc. 
John J, Murphy, son of Mr, and Mrs, | 
John J, Murphy of West Rutland. 


MISS ZlLniA DORION, 

The wedding will take place early 
July at Moody Field, Ga, where 
Pic. Murphy is stationed. 

Miss Dorion, a Rutland High 
school graduate, is the manager of 
the local Sears Roebuck & company 
office, Pfc, Murphy graduated from 
West Rutland High school and prior 
to entering the service was em¬ 
ployed at. the Empire market. 

























Lt. Francis O’Connell 
Weds Bonnie Perkins 
In Baltimore, Md. 


Friends here have received word 
of the marriage of Lt. Francis A. 
O’Connell, USNR, son of Mr, and 
Mrs. Frank O’Connell of Royce 
street, and Miss Bohnie Perkins, 
daughter of Mrs* Donald Riggs Per¬ 
kins and the late Mr, Perkins of 
Baltimore, Md. The ceremony was 
performed May 5 by the Rev* Fath¬ 
er Snyder at the Church of the 
Blessed Sacrament in Baltimore. 

The bride, who was given in mar¬ 
riage by her uncle, Richard Dud¬ 
ley Perkins of Pelham Manor, N. 
Y,. wore a long-sleeved gown of 
white jersey trimmed with pearls, 
and a tulle veil which fell from a 
Juliet cap of pearls. She carried 
a spray of white orchids and a 
prayer book. Miss Betty Jean Per¬ 
kins, J^er sister, was maid of honor; 
another sister. Miss Donna Perkins, 
was junior bridesmaid. Mrs, Arthur 
Powell and Miss Betty Falconer 
were also bridesmaids* 

Dt* (j.g.) Lawrence Donoghue was 
the best man, and the ushers were 
Lt* William Moore and Ens. Louis 
Smith of Washington, D* C., and 
Robert Olt and Miles Hopkins of 
Baltimore. Following the wedding 
a breakfast was served at the Park 
Plaza hotel. 

The bride is an alumna of the 
College of Notre Dame of Mary¬ 
land, and Lt* O’Connell is a gradu¬ 
ate' of Notre Dame university in 
South Bend, Ind, They will make 
their home for the present in Day- 
ton, O,, where Lt O'Connell is sta¬ 
tioned* 










\ND DAILY HERALD, MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 21, 1944. 


TeclvSgt, F. J. O’Shea 
Weds Mary Jane Raab 
In Mishawaka. Indiana 


Word has jus* been received here 
of the marriage on August 12 in 
Mishawaka, Ind., of Miss Mary Jane 
Haab, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Al¬ 
bert J. Saab of Mishawaka, to Tech* 
Sgt, Fra nets J. O'Shea, son of Mrs. 
Dennis E, O'Shea of 29 Kililngton 
avenue, The double ring ceremony 
was performed at St, Monica’s 
church by the Rev. Jerome Bank. 

The bride, who was given in mar¬ 
riage by her brother-in-law, John 
Gioller, was attired in a gown of 
shell pink crepe with accessories 
of contrasting color. She wore a cor¬ 
sage of orchids. 

The matron of honor. Mrs. Walter 
E. Tretinery, sister of the bride, 
wore a gown of orchid crepe with 
contrasting accessories, with a cor¬ 
sage of pink gladioli. Her husband 
was the best man, 
following a reception that was 
held at the LaSalle hotel at South 
Bend, Ind. t the couple left on a wed- 
ing trip to Chicago and northern 
Wisconsin, before returning to Col¬ 
orado Springs, Colo,, where Tech 
Sgt. O'Shea is stationed. 

He entered the Army Air corps 
in August. 1940, and has been Eta- 
Uoned In Panama the South Pa¬ 
cific, returning jfo the states in 
March, 1944. Sgt[ O'Shea, a Rutland 
High school graduate, was employed 
in the office of j the Central Ver¬ 
mont Public Service corporation be¬ 
fore entering service. The bride 
graduated from Mishawaka High 
school, 

Mrs. Dennis O’Shea, mother of 
the bridegroom, was among the 
guests at the wedding. 


lech, Sgt, and Mrs. F, J, O’Shea are shoyrn here following 
recent wedding in Mishawaka. Ind. Sgt. O’Shea is the son 
of Mis. Dennis J. O’Shea of Cleveland avenue. 


tometrist Next 
Co, Also Zenith 


























'-V-' -Mu 

TLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Mr, and Mrs, Arthur T. Paisa 
of 54 Pleasant street have an¬ 
nounced the engagement of 
their daughter* Shirley Mae, 
(above) and Richard F. Fuller, 
Navy Air corps, who is a son 
of Mr, and Mrs, J, Fred Fuller 
of 116 East street. Both are 
graduates of Rutland High 
school, class of 1343, Miss Paisa 
is employed in Belleville, N. J. 
No date has been set for the 
wedding. 













[tland daily herald, 


Martha Halpin 
Is Bride Of 
Gerald Powers! 


Miss Martha HalpLn* daughter of I 
Mrs. Thomas Halpin of East streetl 
became the bride of Gerald Joseph | 
Powers, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Powers of Middletown I 
Springs Saturday morning at € ! | 
o’clock at the Church, of Christ the I 
King, The Kev. John M. Kennedy, | 
officiated. 

Miss Catherine Clifford, organist, J 
played the wedding inarch and ] 
vocal selections were given by | 
George V, Videll. 

The bride was attired in an azure I 
blue chiffon velvet dress with 1 
matching accessories. She carried ) 
a shower bouquet of brlareliff roses | 
and sweet peas. 

The matron of honor, Mrs. E, F. 
Hurley, cousin of the bride, wore a ] 
gown of crushed cherry velvet andf 
carried an arm bouquet of yellow 
pompom chrysanthemums and snap¬ 
dragons. 

John Lynch, cousin of the bride¬ 
groom, was best man. The ushers I 
were Edward Halpin, brother of ] 
the bride, and Paul Gustafson. 

A wedding breakfast was served! 
at the Berv/ick hotel after the) 
ceremony. 

The bride is a graduate of Mount | 
St Joseph’s academy and is em¬ 
ployed at the Rutland Fire Clay I 
company, Mr. Powers, a graduate of I 
Poultney High school, is em ploye 
Jones I 







FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 11, 1946. 


War Bride, Joining Husband In 
Rudand, Enthusiastic About U.S. 


One of the first European wax 
brides to join her husband in Rut¬ 
land is Mrs. Jack G. Ramp of 
Temple street, formerly of Brussels 
and Versailles, who arrived in the 
United States on January 3 after 
sailing from Antwerp, Belgium, on 
December 4* 

Interviewed at the home of her 
husband’s parents shortly after her 
arrival in Rutland this week, Mrs. 
Ramp, who was born Gerda Kitty 
Zeisel in Vienna and is of Czecho¬ 
slovakian nationality, was full of 
enthusiasm for her adopted coun¬ 
try. New York’s skyscrapers, de¬ 
partment stores, and fleets of taxis 
evoked exclamations of admira¬ 
tion from her, but she was equally 
impressed with the frame houses 
of New England, so different from 
Europe’s stone farmhouses. 

“And the gardens!” she said, “I 
think it is wonderful that they do 
not have walls around them.” 

Capt. and Mrs. Ramp were mar¬ 
ried in Versailles last July, after 
meeting when she became his in¬ 
terpreter of French and German 
there over a year ago and in Au¬ 
gust they went through a military 
ceremony in Brussels. Capt. Ramp, 
who was with Supreme headquar¬ 
ters in Germany and who is cur¬ 
rently on terminal leave here, re¬ 
turned to this country earlier in 
the fall, and his wife joined him 
as soon as she could obtain pas¬ 
sage. 

She came to this country on a 
Belgian freighter, through three 
hurricanes in the North Atlantic, 
and the weather was so bad that the 
passengers had to go from their 
cabins to the mess by means of 


ropes stretch along the decks. 
There were other Army wives on 
board, Mrs. Ramp said, from Eng¬ 
land, Belgium, and France, as well 
as two nuns, and two Americans 
who had been stranded in Europe 
since the beginning of the war. 

Mrs. Ramp, who was educated in 
Vienna, Brussels and England 
worked with the French under¬ 
ground during the war, guiding 
grounded Allied airmen out of 
France to the Spanish border. 

“I didn’t realize at the time how 
dangerous it was,” she said, “until 
an American girl who was working 
with us was captured and sent to a 
German concentration camp.” 

She also had some cogent re¬ 
marks to make on living conditions 
in France and Belgium at the 
present time. Food and clothing are 
very scarce except on the black 
market, where you can get almost 
anything, for an exorbitant price. 
Two pounds of butter cost $20. Shoes 
cost $120 a pair in Paris. In Belgium 
the coal ration is 350 pounds a 
month. 

Mrs. Ramp finds it difficult to ac¬ 
custom herself to living in a heat¬ 
ed house. Morale in Europe, she 
says, is still very low, but she add¬ 
ed, with a twinkle in her eye as 
she looked at her husband, “Every¬ 
one in Europe thinks the Americans 
are wonderful people.” 


Herald Photo—Merusi. 

Capt. Jack G. Ramp of Temple street, who entered military 
service avS a single man. is returning to civilian life as a married 
man, his war bride being the former Miss Gerda Kitty Zeisel. 
a Czechoslovakian, who is sbow'n here with her husband, helping 
him to pack away his uniform for keeps. She worked with the 
French underground during the war. (Story same page.) 




























TLAND DAILY HERALD, WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 25, 1942. 


Kah Studio. 

Mrs, William P. Reilly, the former Louise Fucci, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Fucci of River street, was married Monday in St. 
Peter's church to the son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Reilly of Royce 
street. Following- a wedding trip to New York the couple will 
make their home on Royec street. 





AND DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 3, 1944 



Stan Scrgl. Joseph F* Romano, who has just returned to 
this country after serving* for two and a half years with the Army 
Air corps in the Southwest Pacific* is shown with his bride, the 
former Alberta N» Accor si, following: their wedding yesterday at 
the Church of Christ the King, After a honeymoon trip to New 
York, the bridegroom will report to his base in Santa Barbara, 
Cal* Mrs* Komano will make her home in Rutland until her hus¬ 
band is given a permanent aslgnment* —- 














SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 


Miss Elizabeth Davis, 
Corp. H. G. F. Sargent 
To Wed at 2 O’clock! 


Miss Elizabeth R. Davis, daugh¬ 
ter of Mr* and Mrs. P* C* Davis of 
Wood avenue, will be married at 2 
o'clock this afternoon at the home 
of her parents to Corp* Harmon G, 
F, Sargent, now stationed at the 
Army recruiting and Induction cen¬ 
ter here* 

Corp, Sargent is the son of Dr* 
and Mrs* Oscar Sargent of Farm¬ 
ington, N* H. p and graduated in 
1937 from Babson institute, Welles- 
[ley, Mass* He has been in the 
rmy for the past year and a half, 
iss Davis graduated from Rutland 
Igh school in 1940 and has been 
mployed in the office of the city 
Itreasurer, 

About 15 members of the recruit¬ 
ing center staff gave a steak sup¬ 
per for the young couple at Mac's 
diner Thursday night, at which a 
gift of two pictures was presented, 
A *''bridal cake” was a feature of 
.the dinner. J 









TLAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 12, 1944, 



S/Sgt. and Mrs. Frederick L* Snyder of this city are shown 
above just after their marriage yesterday morning at the Church 
of the Sacred Heart of Mary by the Kev, L. Albert Vezina t pastor. 
The bride is the former Irene C* Courcelle, a daughter of Mr* and 
Mrs* Adolphus A, CourcelJe of 15 Charles street, Sgt, Snyder is a 
son of the Jate Mr. and Mrs, Frederick Snyder of Baxter street. 


The bride wore a gown of whil 
silk jersey with full length trail 
Her fingertip veil, which was caugi 
with orange blossoms, was trimme 
wiUi heirloom lace. She carried 
shower bouquet of whiLe roses an 
gardenias, 

Mhl Cadton W. .Southgate, th 
matron of honor, wore & gown n 
rose taffeta and carried a bouqne 
of Talisman roses. Miss Mary A 
Lorefte, the bridesmaid, wore 
floor length gown of moss grec 
and had a bouquet cf yellow roset 
Frank Ryan was the best man 
Mrs. Cour-celle. mother of Mi, 
bride, wore a purple crepe dres 
with black accessories, and a cor 
sage of American Beauty rt>ae= 

A wedding breakfast was serve, 
for members of the wedding pa ^ 
at the Hotel Berwick, foliowc\< k 
i reception at the home > Ml 
and Mrs. Carlton Son t,gate o 
Prospect street About 76 friend 
and relatives attended the recep 

S.'Sgl, Snyder, formerly employ, 
fd by [he Coca-Cola distributijii 
iMnpsny i*,*, has recently Tefttm 
?d .o tnrx country after 32 months 
SBTV.-rg in the south 
:ifie krea. Mrs. Snyder ]#’’&!' 
luir nurse. . f; = s- c 


Irene C. Courcelle And 

Sgt. F. L. Snyder Wed 

By Rev, L. A, Vezina 
_ 

Miss Irene C♦ Courcelle, daughter 
of Mr, and Mrs. Adolphus A. Cotir- 
oelle of 15 Charles afreet, was mar¬ 
ried yesterday morning at 8:80 
o'clock at the Ohiuuh of The Sacred 
Heart of Mary k> S/Sgt. Frederick 
L, Snyder, son of the late Mr, and 
Mrs, Frederick Snyder of Baxter 
street. The Bev, L, Albert Velina 1 
performed the double ring cere¬ 
mony, ’ 





















iVn/fe Rl 


Minerva Seward 
Wed to Resident 
Of Schenectady 

j 

I _ _ , 


Miss Minerva E. Seward, daugh¬ 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Sew¬ 
ard, jr„ of 121 Robbins street be¬ 
came the bride of Raymond A, 
Lam boy of Schenectady, N, Y at 
a nuptial mass yesterday morning 
at & o’clock, celebrated by the 
Rev, Edward J, Gelineau at the 
Sacred Heart of Mary church. 

The mass was preceded by a 
sodality ceremony which w T as per¬ 
formed by the Rev. L, Albert 
Velina, before the altar of the 
Blessed Virgin. The altars w T ere 
decorated with white chrysanthe¬ 
mums and-pink snap dragons. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, wore a 
period gown of ivory duchess satin 
with edgings of real Honllon lace. 
Her finger-tip veil of ivory tulle 
fell from a tiara of satin and net. 
Her bouquet was of white roses and 
sweet alyssum. 

The maid of honor, Miss Janis 
Seward, sister of the bride, wore a 
gown of cantaloupe chiffon with 
a matching Juliet cap and veil. She 
carried Talisman roses and blue 
forget-me-nots. 

The bride was also attended by 
IwQ sodality members* Misses Edna 
Beauchamp and Marie Lallberte, 
who were attired in gowns of 
Jeanette blue chiffon with match¬ 
ing Juliet caps. They carried white 
prayer books. 

j The best man was the bride- 
| groom's brother, Lee N* Lamboy 
of Schenectady. Roy Chase of Sche¬ 
nectady and Henry E. Seward, 3d, 
of Bellows Palls were ushers. 

Mrs, James Burns, cousin of 
the bride, was the soloist and Mrs, 
Mildred Castle Randall played the 
organ. 

A breakfast for the bridal party 
was served at the Hotel Berwick 
and a reception was held at the 
home of the bride's parents. 

Mrs. Lamboy, a graduate of Rut¬ 
land High school, has been employ¬ 
ed for the past two years as a 
bookkeeper at the Carbine Cloth¬ 
ing company. Her husband, who; 
I attended the University of Chicago, 
jls employed as a foreman at the) 
General Electric company in Sche¬ 
nectady, 

After a wadding trip to New York 
and Washington, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lamboy will make their home in 
New Salem, N, Y, 













ceplion which fallowed Weil * l,ljr during a re - 

sr, s jaS^^-TCass - 

sstjss - ** siffst Jwas - 














Wv 

as | 


Janet Stratton^] 
Corp. C. Lincoln 
Married at Ira 


Announcement has been made of 
the wedding of Miss Janet Stratton, 
daughter of Mrs, Clara Stratton* of 
North Street Extension, and Corp, 
Carroll Lincoln, son of Mh and 
Mrs. Arthur Lincoln of Ira, which 
took place at 8 o'clock Saturday 
night at the Ira church. The Rev, 
Edward E. Ena officiated at the 
service, which was attended by 200 
guests. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her brother. Weston 
Stratton of this city, wore a gown 
of "Oh Promise Me” white satin 
fashioned with a sweetheart neck¬ 
line outlined with white pearls. 
Her fingertip length veil was 
caught with orange blossoms and 
pearls. 

The maid of honor was her sis¬ 
ter. Miss Natalie Stratton, and the 
four bridesmaids were Miss Fern 
Eno, Miss Betty Eno and Mrs. Ken¬ 
neth Stratton of Rutland and Miss 
Alba Lincoln of Ira, Miss Stratton 
wore a gown of blue with r ji ri K ay- 
pessaries. Miss Fern Eno Jf was in 
pink, Miss Betty Eno in/ yellow. 
Miss Lincoln in blue ^nd Mrs, 
Stratton in aquamarine. ■ 

Stewart Lincoln of Ira was best 
man for his brother. The ushers 
were Hiram and Kenneth Stratton 
of Rutland and Carroll 1 Gilmore and 
Aldice Lincoln of Ira/ 

A reception was held after the 
ceremony at the home of the bride's 
mother. It was 'attended by 100 
guests. Because of the bridegroom's 
affiliation with fhe Army, decora¬ 
tions were carried out in red E white 
and blue. 

After a short trip, Corp. Lincoln 
will return to Wendover Field, 
Utah, where he is stationed with 
( he aircorps, Mrs, Lincoln will 
emain in Rutland for the duration, 
ufiPTrOk peiaLME dwPnu 














Doris Murray Becomes 
Bride of G. S. Williams 
In Baptist Parsonage 


Miss Doris G. Murray, daughter 
lof H. Russell Murray and the latol 
lMary V. Murray of 6fi Elm street, | 
land George 5. Williams of 47 Sum-U 
Imer street, son of the late Mr. and] 
I Mrs. Samuel and Sarah CAbriel) S 
1 Williams of Chatham, N. Y. t were I 
I married last night by the Rev. E, E .1 
I Franklin in a ceremony performed] 
lat the Baptist parsonage on Ken - 1 
| dall avenue, 

Mrs. Laura Powers Billings and \ 

I Russell F. Powers of Clarendon | 

| attended the couple. 

The bridegroom is roundhouse 1 
foreman for the Rutland Railroad il 
[company. The bride was employed fl 
[by the Howe Scale company as bill- r 
|ing operator prior to her marriage. ] 
The bride wore a larkspur blue 
[suit with matching accessories and 
I wore an orchid corsage. The brides- 1 
maid wore a cadet blue pencil- 
sir ipe suit with a corsage of white ] 

| roses. 

The couple will reside at 62 Elm j| 

[ street. 




I TUESDAY morning, Novemb er 17 , 1942 

I Miss ViolaTMossj 

['Becomes Bride! 

f Of Pvt. G. Wight I 

I Vi ° Ia M0SS ’ daufihter of the 

I e Mrs. Caroline Moss of 105 Har~ 

I vmgton avenue, became the bride of 
I Pvt George Wight, son of Mr? 

° f 32 west ,t™{ 
rTf a Porno on at 2:30 o'clock 

Ip First Methodist church The 
Grippin 

I Mi!il le i e Wer ^ ^tended bv Miss 

l^d AiK°f sister "I'fte S 

(city -Aie^vi 0 * Vondefte of this 

Isiit'wlth W °- re a P^^l-stripe 

I rSenr^te 40 s? £ 

I bridesmaid wore a navy blue dre^s 

I f L a u sase 01 p ' mk roses - 

I hrfL^ i 1 rece Ption was held at the 
T^? me following the cere- 
I mony. Pvt. and Mrs Wi^ht r 

3 >psrsS 5 r 











’LAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 13, 1945. 



Herald Photo, 

Pfc. James G. Thetford and Mrs, Thetford, the former Ann 
Katherine Heaty, are shown above just after their marriage Sunday 
at SL Peter's rectory* The bride, who is a WAVE, is a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Hcaly of Forest street. The bridegroom 
Is a son of Mr. and Mrs, William Thetford of Belleville* N. J. 











LAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, 



Lt. Carleton Lee Wilson, Army Air corps, sod of Mr. and Mrs, 
Carleton Wilson of East Center street, and Miss Martha Jane Tem¬ 
ple, daughter of Mayor and Mrs. Wayne N, Temple of North Main 
street, are shown above. Plans for their wedding on June 30 were 
announced yesterday. 


Miss Martha Temple to Be Wed 
On June 30 to Lt. C. Lee Wilson 


Plans were announced yes¬ 
terday for the wedding on Sat¬ 
urday, June 30, at the Congrega¬ 
tional church in this city of 
First Lt, Carle ton Lee Wilson, 
U, 3, Army Air corps, son oif 
Mr. and Mrs. Carleton Wilson 
of East Center street end Miss 
Martha Jane Temple, daughter 
of Mayor and Mrs. Wayne N, 
Temple of North Main street: 

The small family wedding 
■will take place at 4:30 o'clock in 
the afternoon at the church. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Rutland High school and of 
Colby Junior college in New 


London, N, H., and has (been en¬ 
gaged in war work in the draft¬ 
ing department of Pratt & Whit¬ 
ney at East Hartford, Conn. 

Lt. Wilson recently returned 
to this country after being lib¬ 
erated from a Nazi prisoner of 
war camp in Moosburg, Ger¬ 
many, where he was interned 
for several months after line 
Flying Fortress he was piloting 
was shot dowm over Germany. 
He completed 28 missions over 
Nazi territory, Lt. Wilson, who 
entered the service nearly five 
years ago, is home on 60-day 
leave. 

















fLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Shown above is Cadet Ed¬ 
ward James Willcox, son of 
Mrs. Julius A. Willcox of Ply¬ 
mouth and tlie late Justice Will- 
cox of the Vermont Supreme 
court, who will lake as his 
bride. Miss Constance E* 
Kountz, daughter of A- E. 
Kountz of Pittsburgh* Pa. Cadet 
Willcox is a senior at West 
Point and upon his graduation, 
January §, will go to Fort Sill, 
Okla, His bride-to-be is a 
junior in Mary mount college. 







Sgt. Kenneth F. Vennett and his wife, the former Dclphine 
Bixler of Tampa, Fla., shown above, have just arrived at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Vennett of Kingsley avenue, parents of 
Sgt. Vennett. The young man. who is stationed at Plant Park 
airfield, Tampa, is on a 15-day furlough. _ 





























RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Mr, and Mrs- Dorman G. Freark, above, were married Saturday 
afternoon at the home of the bride's parents here, Mrs, Freark is 
the former Miss Carolyn J, Flanders, daughter or Mr- and Mrs. 
Seneca N. Flanders of East street. 


Carolyn J. Flanders 
Wed at Home To 
Dorman G, Frearl 


Miss Carolyn J, Flanders, daughie 
of Mr. and Mrs* Seneca N. Flanders] 
of 58 East street, became the bride 
of Dorman G* Freark Saturday af 
ter noon at 5:30 o'clock at the ihomei 
of her parents. 

The candlelight ceremony wasl 
performed before an improvised! 
arch of Easter lilies and greens, by' 
the Rev. J. Gray don Brown. TJhej 
bride was given in marriage by her 
father. 

Mrs* Marlon Shields of New York 
served as matron of honor, and the 
best man was Robert Williams of 
Springfield, 

Born in Rutland, the bride at¬ 
tended local schools, graduating 
from Rutland High school. She is 
now employed as secretary in the 
Reeves Sound laboratory in New 
York, 

The bridegroom was born In 
New York, and graduated from 
Stevens college, N. Y„ and is em¬ 
ployed at the research metallurgy 
department of o New Jersey gyro¬ 
scope company. His mother* Mrs. 
A, Cramer, attended the wedding. 

About 30 relatives and friends 
were present for the ceremony and 
at a dinner served at the Hotel 
Bsrdwell following the service. 















Patricia J. Charron, 
Sergt. A. Macfarlane 
Marry at Army Camp 


I 9 ' 

Mr, and Mrs, Galas Charron o t 
Sheldon place have announced the 
marriage of their daughter, Miss 
Patricia J, Charron, to First Sergt, 
Albert Macfarlane of Wallingford. 
The ceremony took place in the post 
chapel at Camp Butner, N. C, ( on 
November 14. The Rev. McDermott 
officiated at the double ring cere¬ 
mony, There was music played by 
Corp* Edward Collins. 

The bride wore a gown of white 
duchess satin and a fingertip veil. 
She carried a bouquet of white 
roses and swansonia. The matron 
of honor, Mrs. Glenn Slater, was 
dressed in sky blue brocaded satin 
and carried pink chrysanthemums 
and snapdragons, 

A reception was held at the camp 
guest house. Sergt. and Mrs, Mac¬ 
farlane are now residing in Dur¬ 
ham, N. C, 

Mrs. Macfarlane, who was gradu¬ 
ated from Mount St Joseph acad¬ 
emy, had been employed in Spring- 
field. Her husband, a graduate of 
Wallingford High school, was em¬ 
ployed by the American Fork & 
Hoe company there. 





RUTLAND DAILY HERAL 


Mr; and Mrs, Dorman G, Freark, above, were married Saturday 
afternoon at the home of the bride's parents here, Mrs, Freark Is 
the former Miss Carolyn J, Flanders; daughter of Mr. and Mrs, 
Seneca N, Flanders of East street. 


Carolyn J, Flanders 
Wed at Home To 
Dorman G. Frearl 


Miss Carolyn J. Flanders,-daughter] 
of Mr. and Mrs, Seneca N. Flanders 
of 58 East street, became the bride] 
of Dorman G, Freark Saturday af* 
ternoon at 5:30 o'clock at the home] 
of her parents, 

The candlelight ceremony wasl 
performed before an improvised! 
arch of Easter lilies and greens, by] 
the Rev. J, Gray don Brown, The 
bride was given in marriage by her| 
father. 

Mrs, Marion Shields of New York I 
served as matron of honor, and the 
best man was Robert Williams of] 
Springfield, 

Bom in Rutland, the bride at-1 
tended local schools, graduating 
from Rutland High school. She is 
now employed as secretary in the 
Reeves Sound laboratory In New] 
York. 

The bridegroom was born ini 
New York, and graduated from I 
Stevens college, N, Y„ and is em¬ 
ployed at the research metallurgy 
department of a New Jersey gyro¬ 
scope company. His mother, Mrs. | 
A. Cramer, attended the wedding, 
About 30 relatives and friends! 
were present for the ceremony and 
at a dinner Served at tbe Hotel] 
Bar dwell following the service. 



















RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


X. Mary J, Flanagan 
Wed at Army Airbase 
To Lt. A. W. Monaco 


NEW CASTLE ARMY ALR BASE, 
Wilmington, Del, «By Mail)—Lt 
Mary J, Flanagan, flight nurse as- 
Isigned to the 2d Ferrying group, 
Ferrying division, Air Transport 
command, became the bride recent¬ 
ly of Lt, Anthony W> Monaco, navi- 
^gator in the Army Air forces and a 
graduate of the University of Chi¬ 
cago and Loyola university. 

Li, Flanagan, whose home is in 
RUTLAND* VT lt was married in the 
chapel at the New Castle Army Air 
base, 2d Ferrying Group headquar¬ 
ters near Wilmington, on November 
2 \. Services were performed by the 
Rev, William J, McEIwaine, Cath¬ 
olic chaplain. 

The bride, daughter of Mr, and 
Mrs. James T. Flanagan of Rutland, 
and a graduate of Mount St Joseph 
academy and of St. Francis hospital 
school Hartford, Conn,, wore an 
eggshell satin dress with marqui¬ 
sette yoke and carried a corsage of 
white roses and sweet peas. 

Li, Monaco, son of Mr. and Mrs, 
Anthony Monaco of Chicago, had 
as his best man. Cap! Edwin J, 
Brissey, transport pilot attached to 
the 2d Ferrying group, while Li 
Flanagan was attended by Rita E. 
McGarry of James street, Rutland, 


Lt. Anthony W. Monaco, navigator in the Army Air forces, and 
his bride, the former Lt. Mary J, Flanagan, flight nurse, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs, James T, Flanagan of 132 Jliver street, are shown 
following their recent marriage at the New* Castle Army Airbase, 
Wilmington, Del. 


















Minerva Sewardl 
Wed to Resident! 
Of Schenectadvl 


Miss Minerva R, Seward* daugh¬ 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry E, Sew¬ 
ard, jr., of 121 Robbins street be¬ 
came the bride of Raymond A. 
Lamboy of Schenectady, N, Y., at 
a nuptial mass yesterday morning 
at 9 o'clock, celebrated by the 
Rev. Edward J« Gelineau at the 
Sacred Heart of Mary church. 

The mass was preceded by a 
sodality ceremony which was per¬ 
formed by the Rev. L, Albert 
Vezina, before the altar of the 
Blessed Virgin* The altars were 
decorated with white chrysanthe¬ 
mums and pink snap dragons. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, wore a 
period gown of ivory duchess satin 
with edgings of real Honitoo lace. 
Her finger-tip veil of ivory tulle 
fell from a tiara of satin, and net. 
Her bouquet was of white roses and 
sweet alyssum. 

The maid of honor, Miss Jams 
Seward, sister of the bride, wore a 
gown of cantaloupe chiffon with 
a matching Juliet cap and veil. She 
carried Talisman roses and blue 
forget-me-nots. 

The bride was also attended by 
two sodality members, Misses Edna 
Beauchamp and Marie Laliberfe, 
who were attired in gowns of 
jeanette blue chiffon with match¬ 
ing Juliet caps. They carried white 
prayer books. 

The best man was the bride¬ 
groom's brother, Lee N. Lamboy 
of Schenectady. Roy Chase of Sche¬ 
nectady and Henry E. Seward, 3d, 
of Bellows Falls were ushers, 

Mrs, James - Burns, cousin of 
the bride, was the soloist and Mrs. 
Mildred Castle Randall played the 
organ. 

A breakfast for the bridal party 
was served at the Hotel Berwick 
and a reception was held at the 
home of the bride's parents. 

Mrs. Lamboy, a graduate of Rut¬ 
land High school, has been employ¬ 
ed for the past two years as ' a 
bookkeeper at the Carbine Cloth¬ 
ing company. Her husband, who 
attended the University of Chicago, 
is employed as a foreman at the 
General Electric company in Sche¬ 
nectady, 

After a wedding trip to New York 
and Washington, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lam,boy will make their home In 
New Salem, N, Y* 













RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 30, 1942. 


Oslund Studio. 

Miss Elia Catherine Hamilton of Baxter treet became the bride 
of Match John Taraiumch, son of Mrs. Christinla Taranovlch of 
Florence, Sunday in a ceremony performed on the silver anniversary 
of the wedding: of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E, P. Hamilton, shown 
above. These photos were taken on the occasion of the double cele¬ 
bration. 














Lttland daily herald. 


Pfc. Richard Barrett 
Of US Medical Corps 
Takes British Bride 


Announcement has been made of 
the recent marriage in England of 
Pfc, Richard X Barrett, son of Mr 
and Mrs, Walter X Barrett of Jack- 
son avenue, and Miss Edna Jenkins, 
daughter of Mrs, Frederick Jenkins 
of Abersavanney^ England, 


PFC, AND MRS, BARRETT, 

The ceremony took place at St 
The ceremony took place at St, 
Michael a church in Abergavannoy, 
Pfc, Barrett, who has been station-* 
ed in England for several months, 
has served with the U. S, Army 
Medical corps for the past two 
years. Prior to his induction in this 
city in May r 1942^ he was employed 
as maintenance foreman for the 
Rutland railroad. 













DAILY HERALD, MONDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 28, 1942. 



Tappan Photo. 

Lieut, Ralph limit Seeley, Jr.* is shown with his bride, the 
former Mary Louise Spaulding, following their wedding Saturday 
night at the Congregational church. 


Miss Spaulding 
Is Married To 
Lt. R. Seeley, Jr.- 


Before an altar banked with ever- 1 
greens, Mary Louise Spaulding, 
daughter of Mrs. Richard B. Spauld¬ 
ing of East Center street, became 
the bride of Lieut. Ralph Hunt 
Seeley, jr., of Fort Banks, Mass., 
son of D r. and Mrs, E. H. Seeley 
of North Grove street, Saturdayjj 
night at the Congregational church 
The single ring service was per¬ 
formed by the Rev. J. Gray dan 
Brown, pastor of the church, 

Lieut. Albertc H. Bellerose, broth- 1 
er-in-law of the bridegroom, was 
best man and the bride was attended 
by her sister, Lucy Ann Spaulding. 
The bride was attired in a wedding 
gown of white satin and tulle with 
a fingertip veil and carried a bridal 
bouquet of white roses and white 
sweet peas. Her attendant wore yel¬ 
low silk Jersey with gold accessories 
and carried a bouquet of yellow 
roses and bronze chrysanthemums, 

The ushers at the church were 
Richard Hubie of Hartford, Conn., 
Lieut, Edward Carey of Fort Dev- 
ens, Mass., Dr, J. Seeley Estabrook 
of Brandon and Harold Beane of 
Rutland, Mrs. Earl S, Wright played 
the organ. 

Immediately following the cere¬ 
mony, a reception was held at the 
home of the bride for the immediate 
families and young friends of the 
bride and bridegroom. Lieut, and 
Mrs. Seeley, who will spend their 
honeymoon in New York, will re¬ 
side in Boston. Lieut. Seeley is sta¬ 
tioned at Fort Banks, Wmthrop, 
Mass. 

Out-of-town guests at the recep 
tion included Miss Betty Brown and 
Miss Lindy Henry of the Katherinel 
Gibbs school at Boston, classmates 
of the bride, Lieut. Prescott Well¬ 
man of Rutland and Boston, Kings¬ 
ley Smith of Springfield, Mrs, Hubie 
Smith of Hartford, Conn.* Dr. and] 
Mrs. John W. Estabrook, Mrs. J. 
Seeley Estabrook and daughter, 
Penelope, of Brandon, and Charles! 
Bangert of Schenectady, N. Y, 





















jUJTLAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEM 


I 


.v j 


Here i 

I Com- f 


R 






■ 


fef ? 


At 
vious 
heart 
terd^ 
was , 
whij 
23, 




•« *•*««'» Capl. Marry K. Ryan. Jr.. Armv Air Con* 
| d . k kit , d *!f CjU “ nt ' and his f>ridr, the former Daisy V RawU 
?J 'l h " n \ “«» iflf Wejwm to cut with a saber a three- 
llered Vrddlng cake which fonneii an important item In table dec- 
orations during a reception which followed their marriage at lu,),- 

0 fll',!l,bn 0 r r ' ) 8 'o The hr , idt ,a " ,iau shter of Mrs. James H. Rate Is 
of Dublin, rapt. Ryan, alumnus of Dartmouth college ami «f the 

'7“" nt is a son of l*r. and Mrs. 

Moultrie’ r• ° f tWS Cjt, ‘ m IS n “ W sh,t!onrd at f ' lm P Spence. 


irsonals 


niljam B. Shan- 
jtffmie are spend- 

t has gone to 
Df the death 
pther Mrs 
. from the 


Capt. Harry R. Ryan 
Takes Daisy Rawls 


fcof New 
arents 

I 


As Bride in Georgia ‘1 

o 1 - J 


who 
liad, is 
pent®, 
pfe of 


Announcement was made yester- 
day of the marriage at D Li biin, G* 
on October 28 of Capt, Harry B; 
Ryan, Army Air Carp,? Medical de- 
taenmenb and son o! Dr, and Mrs. 
Harry R, Ryan of 5 Court street, this 
city, and Miss Daisy Paulina Rawls, 
daughter of Mrs, James Horrie 
Rawls of Dublin. The ceremony 
jouk place at the Church of the 
Immaculate Conception in Dublin, 
the Rev. Nicholas J, Frteelle off,* 
dating. 


thl 


rattle- 
Ibi ers, 
[ Ray- 
ave- 
_ and 
I Pills- 


CapL Ryan, who H a graduate of 
Dartmouth college. 1937, and the I 
College of Medicine, University of I 
Vermont, 1941, if now stationed at 
Spence field. Moultrie. Qa s He | 
tered the Army two year® ago after 
interning at Filth Avenue hospital 
in New York, 

The bride wa« educated «t Middle 
Georgia college, Cochran, and Mer¬ 
cer university, ACicoji. Ca. She was 
chosen Campus bcaifty'* at berth cob 

JSIP. #»d was voted "Miss Middle 
Geurgu College." 

bllde was \ attended 


Tul 

XovJ 

si, a 

W P n 

at (I 


the 


Bal 

temC 

S, hoi 

thu 




































u ha 

RUTLAND DAILY HERALD,! 


CoLdonato riiolo.l 

Hayden X LaBrskc and his bride, I he former Mi&s Olive XJ 
Bell, are shown after their wedding Saturday morning in the ( hurehj 
of the Sacred Heart of Mary. 


Olive E. Bell 
Atty. LaBrake 
Married Here! 


In bd autumn wedding at the 
Church of the Sacred Heart of Mary 
Saturday morning at I* o'clock, Miss 
Olive E. BeU f daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs, Edward Bell of Maple street, 
became the bride of Hayden J, 

|| LaBrake, ^on of Mr. and Mrs, John 
B. LaBrake of Davis street. 

The ceremony was performed 
during a nuptial mass by the Bov. 

I Edward X Gelincau, curate. The ’ 
acolytes were John and Donald La- 
Brake, nephew of the bridegroom. 

The musical program during the i 
service was given by Mrs, Mildred 
Castle Lob dell, organist, and Fran¬ 
cis Ryan, soloist 
The bride, who was given in mar- 
uriage by her father, wore a gown| 
of ivory slipper satin, princess style,, 
with embroidery of seed pearls. Her j 
linger tip veil of old lace felt from 
a tiara dt orange blossoms. Her | 
bouquet consisted of white roses a mi 
swansonia. The maid of honor. Miss 
GiEsella Zechnor of Proctor, wore a 

\ 

skirt cd rainbow net, and a matching, 
velvet haL She carried a bouquet; 
of red roses. 

. The bridesmaids were nieces of 
the bride, Misses Octavia and Bar¬ 
bara Jean Relihan. who wore 
frocks of tea rose and jade green 
ribbon taffeta, respectively, with 
matching headdress. They carri 
colonial bouquets. 

In the bridegroom's party were 
hi* brother. Freeman LaBrake o* 
Saratoga Springs. K. Y_ best ma 
and William ft. Mangan and Robe 
H, Carpenier of this city, usher 

ds a 1 ! 

i'ryed a*. 

Berwick, A program wa- 

given by an. orchestra directed hv 
Burni E. Martin. A reception 

[jKtJ 1 lhe h,,,nt: of lhc »>**•*, 
W VltbSS *ehno| Ui j* C &gfj‘l 

^ , who h °*ds the office of 

, s&SSS 
&nsn8&s& 

ta »« « ^*ple *rtrrei. 



















LAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 11, 1944. 



Just to prove the hospitality accorded American servicemen in Australia* Pvt. Gene Morrello, 
27, son of Domenic Morrello of 98 Granger street* has forwarded to his father the above picture* 
showing an American Red Cross party during the Christmas holidays. The arrow points to Pvt. 
Morello* who has been In the Southwest Pacific area for two years. He left Rutland with tlnt^Termont 
National Guard. Pvt. Morelia came from Italy to Rutland in 1921), to join his father* who had 
planned to establish a home here for the family. A younger brother, Mario* followed 10 years later. 
The boys’ mother and an older brother* still reside in Ma roc on a* near Naples, Italy. Through the Am¬ 
erican Red Cross, they w'ere last heard from in August., Morrello hopes that his family will be re¬ 
united here after the war. The father of Pvt. Morrello, who received the picture this week* offers it 
for publication, believing that other Vermont servicemen may be found in the group. Do you see a 
familiar face? 


















TLAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 11, 1942. 



Selectees From Rutland Coun¬ 
ty Board No. 1 Signed Up, 
23 Air Cadets Listed. 


A total of 39 men, all registrants 
of Rutland county draft board No, 

I, were inducted yesterday at the 
state Army recruiting headquarters 
on Center street In addition 23 men 
including two Rutland youths were 
notified of their acceptance as Army 
air cadets and four persons were 
enlisted for the regular Army yes-' 
terday. 

Rutland selectees include Ken¬ 
neth L. Haynes, Neil W. Robinson,* 
Nicholas C. Smiel, Thomas M. 
Pierce, Reginald Pitts, K el ton R* 
West com, Robert J. Sheridan, Ger¬ 
ald W. Spaulding, James T. Burke, 
Leon J. Kantorski, Neville J. Bar¬ 
rett, Charles R. Stratton, Robert A 
Hebert, Walter B. Perkins, Roscoe 

J. Wilbur, William £, Reardon, 
Robert C. Da vine, Romeo L. Mayo, 
Carmen D. Mazzariello and Ray¬ 
mond E. Catozzi, 

Others inducted from areas out¬ 
side the city were Zigmont S. 
Grabowskl of Clarendon Springs, 










A group of servicemen from the Rutland area who were home on furlough is shown above. They 
rre: (L to r) front—George Marehand* Star Thornton, Edward Tatko (Granville, N* 1\) Tom Mo Don* 
>ugh (Granville, N* Y.) and C. J* Taylor, Back row; C. Mills, Francis HelTcrnan, George Gilman. 
Francis Baker, Pascal Romano, Peter Hembick an d E, B* Blanchard. The girls are Molly Blake and 
Ethel Avery, who work In tbe Bellows Falls station where the picture was taken as the men waited 
for the Rutland train* The picture was snapped by George Wright of Castle ton, Signal Corps pho¬ 
tographer, Service Command headquarters, Boston* 


















RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, NOV 



Herald Photo. 

With the Army placing special emphasis upon the enlistment of IS- and 19-year-old youths, yesterday was a banner day at the 
recruiting station on Center street when Z7 young men in the age group entered Army service* Altogether 41 men of all ages were 
enlisted yesterday, the largest number for a single day since short ly after Pearl Harbor, 

Maj, Charles H. Roberts, in charge of the recruiting station is at left above, and at right is Lieut, Patrick J, O'Brien, The IS- and 
19-year-olds, most of whom signed up for the Air corps. Coast Artillery, Cavalry, or Armored force, are (L to r,|: 

Front row: Raymond L* Weston of VVarren, Bernard IL Blo w ot South Burlington, James E, Clark of St, Johmbury, James II, 
Hagan of Newport, Percy L. Sylvester of Irasburg, Ferley A, Knighton of W f elis River, Fulbert W„ Demers of Wilder, Frederick B. Demers 
of Wilder, Albert E. Couture of Hartford, Robert C, Rexford of Irasburg. 

Second row; Gordon T. Raymond of Burlington, Raynold II, McMann of Lemlngton, Paul E, Carman of W’inauskl, Francis E, 
OTlara, jr v of Burlington, Alfred B. Nedeau, jr^ of North he Id, Weldon H, Spaulding of WUUston, Robert V, Giroux of Burlington, Marcel 
A* Gervais of Newport Center, Robert E. Folson of South Royalton, Robert A, Lizotte of Burlington, Stanley F. Plant of Burlington, 
Robert W. Neill of NorthBeld, Raymond C, Smith of Waterbury, Stewart F. Wheeler of Lyndonville, Frank A, Riggs of Richmond, Wal¬ 
lace E. Chapin of South Londonderry and Robert D. Wheeler of Lyndonville, 


L^l 


















NOVEMBER 18. 1944. 


e to Be Played in 


BT W 


Hi 




Photo by Joe Colo dona to 
Shown above are seven former Rutland High school athletes 
now in the U* S, Navy, The boys are all at home ©n leave and 
persuaded a Rutland photographer io snap this picture in front of 
the school. Top row (I* to r), George Braves, Bob FCehoe* Henry 
Henrichon. Alberigo CioffL Bottom row, Melvin Sheppard, Elio 
Filippo, AJmerlgo CfoffL Both Braves and Sheppard have been 
overseas. 





















fTLAND DAILY HERALD. TUESDAY MORNING. OCT| 




fr' 


Sfl. Robert C, Joy ileflK 
brother of Mtsl Howard Do tig- 
Ian of Roberts avenue, recently 
arrived in New York from 
India after eight month* of 
service with the Office of Stra¬ 
tegic services in China, pre¬ 
ceded by a year in the Middle 
East. Sgt. Joy Is a graduate 
of Proctor High school and at¬ 
tended Dartmouth college for 
two years before entering serv¬ 
ice, His home now Is in Roches¬ 
ter, N. H. At right (above) i* Ed 
Crane of Burlington, with whom 
Joy roomed while at Dart¬ 
mouth, 


Autumn 

Weddings 


BROUGH-BURKE. 

(Special U? The Herald.) 

CASTLETGN, Oct. 29—At a wedJ 
ding in 5L John's Catholic church I 
here yesterday afternoon, Miss Dor- j 
othy Burke became the bride of I 
Charles Brough. The Rev, J. J. 
O'Brien officiated. 

The bride wore a princess tlyle 
white satin and net dress with! 
sweetheart neck line* a string of I 
matched pearls and a shoulder I 
length veil of illusion which fell] 
from a juHet cap* She earned a 
bouquet of white rose® and snap-] 
dragons. I 

Miss Mary J^»ne Brough, sister of 
the bridegroom, was bridesmaid. U 
She wore a blue velvet dress and a| 
cap of gold doth and carried violet 
chrysanthemums and snapdragons. 
The best man was William Burke J 1 
brother of the bride. 

Ushers were John Brough and 
Raymond Burke, brothers of the 
bride and bridegroom* Soloist was 
James O'Neill. 

After the ceremony a reception 
was held at the home of the bride 
for the immediate family and! 
friends. ,, 

The bride's traveling costume was 
of brown with brown accessories. 
The young couple has gone to Mon-1 
treal and on their return they will j 
be at home on Griswold avenue. 

Mrs. Brough, a graduate of West 
Rut Sand High school, and- of_Ri 














I THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 4. 1945. 



AAF Photo. 

Sift. William A. Stanley, loft* soil of Mrs, Cecilia L, Stanley 
<»f 31 KiKington avenue, and Master Sgt, Joseph C, Mott* son of 
Mr* and Mrs, E. W. Mott of 61 Plain street* are stationed in the 
Flying Fortress wing headquarters of the 15th AAF in Italy ac¬ 
cording to word just received by mail from those headquarters* 

Sgt* Stanley is a Iiuthind High school graduate and ex-payroll 
clerk in the Central Vermont Public Service corporation* Re¬ 
calling his arrival at Casablanca* December 34, 1943, he says 
+, We slept on the concrete lloor of a drafty warehouse, through 
which rats scurried. Next day wo had our first view of the city 
where President Roosevelt and Mr. Churchill were soon to demand 
unconditional surrender*" 

Sgt, Mott was formerly employed In the stores department 
at the Rutland railroad* He is now' in his second period of over¬ 
seas service. A member of the regular armv since January 7, 
1941* he was in the cadre which activated the Eighth Air force in 
Britain in 1943. Hospitalized, he returned to the United States 
in October, 1942, Late last year he debarked in Casablanca. Going 
to Italy last spring* Sgt* Mott was assigned to the 15th Air force 
B-17 Wing* Me has two brothers in the armed forces. Pfe* John 
E* Molt, Field Artillery, on Guam, and Marine Pfe* Richard I). 
Mott, veteran of the Marshall and Gilbert islands* now at Mare 
Island* Cal. 














rLAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 27, 1944. 



Three Rutland men are shown above, just after they had met 
fur a reunion in the New Guinea jungles. They are, left to right, 
Staff Sgt l armlne Fleet, son of Mrs, Rose Facta of River street* 
LL Ray Burke, son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Burke of Brown 
street and hUfT SfL Joseph Marotti. son of Mr. and Mrs, Louis 
MiroUi of Traverse place. The young men. childhood chums, ob- 
Ulne^d eon tact with each other as the outcome of a statement in 
The Heralds 'News from Home” column, announcing that U 
Rurke would like to get In touch with other servicemen from Rut¬ 
land and vicinity. 




















RUTLAND DAILY HERALD. THURSDAY MORNING. JUNE 14, 1945 







, 


LI 








p| 






r 




These Marines tend to the mail situation on Okinawa. Left to right: Pfc. Raymond J. Adams, 
whose parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Adams, live at Oak Park, III.; T/Sgt. Thomas N. Porter* 
whose wife, Alice, and their two children live at 23 Burnham avenue, Rutland. Vk; and Sgt. 
Harrel A. Hammer, whose father, John N. Hammer, lives at Austin. Minn. (Associated Press Photo.) 















The four servicemen In the picture arc sum of Mr. and Mrs, 
Joseph A, Duprey of 154 Jackson avenue, three of whom were 
recently discharged from Military service, and the fourth who ex¬ 
pects to be released soon,. Petty Officer 3/c Joseph A.* served two 
and a half years, with 20 months overseas and was discharged 
last December. Sgt Charles L„ was discharged in November 
after 37 months* service, of which 32 months were served over¬ 
seas. Discharged In December, Pfe. Robert F„ served 45 months 
and spent two and one-half years In the Pacific theater. S 1/c 
Raymond R„ is at present awaiting separation from the service 
at Portland, Me. He has served two of a total of two and one- 
half year* of service in the Pacific theater, Reading from left 
to right, the picture shows Charles, Robert, Raymond and Joseph. 








RUTLAND DAILY HERALD. THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 14. 1944 



Uurulil Photo. 


After short furloughs spent at home these *ix Rutland area sailors, who have been together 
through thick and thin since they joined the service in June, 1M3, will report hack for duty today, 
stationed on a carrier these boys have seen action at Savrar, Wukde, llollandta, Truk, Ponape, 
the battle for the Marianas, in the Bonin islands, Pagan Island and the second battle of Iwo Jiiua, besides 
other engagements. The boys are tl to r.) S 1/c Claude Taggart, jr., son of Claude Taggart of Cas- 
tteton; fCT 3/c Elmer Peck, sun of Mr, and Mrs, Ralph Peek of Rutland; F 1/c Cyril W, Manney, jr., 
of Mend on; S 1/e Philip Pratko, son of Mr, and Mrs, Nalale FraticO of Rutland; S 1/c Robert 
Putnam, son of Mr, and Mrs, John J, Putnam of Rutland; and ¥ 3/c Francis Margo, son of Mr. and 
Mrs, James Margo, also of Rutland, 


V\ 















RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 



The four servicemen in the picture are sons of Mr, and Mrs, 
Joseph A, Duprey of 154 Jackson avenue, three of whom were 
recently discharged from Military service, and the fourth who ex¬ 
pects to be released soon.- Petty Officer 2/c Joseph A., served two 
and a half years, with 20 months overseas and was discharged 
last December. Sgt Charles L„ was discharged in November 
after 37 months' service, or which 22 months were served over¬ 
seas, Discharged in December, Ffe. Robert F„ served 45 months 
and spent two and one-half years In the Pacific theater. S 1/c 
Raymond R„ is at present awaiting separation from the service 
at Portland. Me, He has served two of a total of two and one- 
half years of service in the Pacific theater. Reading from left 
to right, the picture shows Charles, Robert, Raymond and Joseph. 



















Two more Rutland boys who 
r ju across each other on a far 
war front are shown above. 
Marine Pfe, Joseph Ransom 
I left J recently sent the picture 
to his parents. Mr, and Mrs. E. 
C. Raiisiim. East Pittsford mad. 
With him is Marine Pft\ Harold 
Pippin, Jr., whose parents live 
on School street. The two 
Marines enjoyed a whole day 
of liberty on a Pacific island. 
Ransom wrote his parents. His 
brother, Ptc, Robert Ransom, 
also Is stationed in the Pacific 
area, and although the two 
brothers were on the same 
island for quite a while they 
never met and have not seen 
each other for three years. 











RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, T 




h ? ;■% 

■tpj 


j 


Herald Photo* 

Man workers in the orderly room of Company A, 1724 In¬ 
fantry* are shown above at the armory yesterday cheeking lists 
of equipment in preparation for departure of the former National 
Guardsmen for training at Camp Blanding, Fla. They are U, to 
tsi Serst. Phillip E. Matt* C'orp, Alexander F. Keefe and Pvt. 
Everett f. linord 


I 
























RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 

























RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY MORNING* APRIL 28, 1944 












■ 


Official V, S, Marine Corps Photo. 

The 200-pound porker who wandered a hit too close to a Ms-* 
Hne on New Britain, ended up in the hands of Pvt, Donald C. 
Shedd, son of Mr, and Mrs, Clarence Shedd of Shedd Place, shown 
above at right; Sergt, Anthony M. Iordan of Hazelton. Pa., above 
at left and Corp, Harry J. Leber of Union City, N, J„ the latter 
l*eiug the one who shot the fresh meat only 15 yards from his 
jungle hammock. The three Marines were named "’cooks and 
butchers" for the occasion and are shown before a background of 
typical shattered palm trees—a reminder of the "big Jap fight," 
but seemingly oblivious to ail but the feast ahead. Pvt. Shedd is 
one of three brothers who were all assigned to the same combat 
unit, saw New Zealand and several of the South Pacific islands 
together, and finally fought the Japs during the first two months 
Guadalcanal in the same squad. 

















12 


RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, M 


Three Rutland Hospital Nurses 
Commissioned in Navy’s Corps 


To the expanding list of service 
branches in which Rutlanders are 
serving one more has been added 
with the commissioning of three 
Rutland hospital nurses In the Navy 
Nurse corps—the first to be sworn 
in from the Rutland hospital. 

The young women, who have just 
received their orders to report for 


•‘boor training at Sampson* N. 
on May 10 are: Ensign Joyce Rose¬ 
mary Beauchamp, 22-year-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Beauchamp of 340 Adams street. En¬ 
sign Josephine L. Gladski, 21 
daughter of Mrs, Josephine Gladski 
I of Green Square, Proctor, and En- 
.sUn Agnes Elizabeth Burke, 21* 
(daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Burke of 9 Killington avenue. 
Although over 20 graduates of 
[the Rutland hospital nursing school * 
ave joined the Army Nurse corps, 
with two now first lieutenants, the 
trio are believed to be the first 
to enter the Navy Nurse corps, 
somewhat smaller but now being 
enlarged. 

Just why they chose the Navy, the 
three young women were unable to 
ay when interviewed last night, 
ey simply “have had it planned 
for some time/' Ensign Beauchamp 
hnd Burke were classmates in the 
class of 1940 at Rutland High school 
and Ensign Gladski was one year 
ahead of them; all three graduated 
from the Rutland hospital in 1943. 

As nurses the girls received an 
affiliate course in pediatrics training 
at the Children's Memorial hospital 
in Montreal, Canada. At the hos¬ 
pital they belonged to the Red 
Cross student reserve and joined the 
American Red Cross as American 
National Red Cros^ nurses. They 
are members of the hospital Nurses' 
Alumnae association and of state 
and national organizations. 

The next step for the young 
[officers will be training for an In- 
effnite period at the big base at 
ampson where they will step Into 
he Nurse corps uniform. 

The Navy Nurse corps uniform 
tar winter, seldom seen around Rut- 
and, consists of Navy blue jackets 
nd skirts, with a gold ensign stripe 
nd the insignia of the corps, A 
ummer outfit is pure while with 
lack equate ts and stripe of rank, 
^e distinctive hat is similar to the 
favy officers' dress cap without the 
isor, is in blue or white, and carries 
e large Navy emblem. 

Another Rutland nurse. Miss 
ne E. Mandigo of Royce street, 
low employed at Windsor hospital, 
enlisted in the Navy Nurse 
but has not yet received her 

ipers. 



Iterate Photo, 

Three Rutbnd hospital nurses who are the first from the hospital School or Nursing to Join 
the Navy Nurse corps are tl. to r.) Ensign Agnes Elizabeth Burke, daughter of Mr. ami Mrs, T. J, 
Burke of KillitigvS avenue; Ensign Josephine L. GJadskl, daughter of Mrs. Josephine Gladski of 
Proctor; and Ensijj Joyce R, Beauchamp, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Beauchamp of’Adams street. 
The three young Women, who graduated as nurses together in 1943, will leave Rutland on May 10 
for Sampson. N. 1 tl 
























RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


64 Howe Scale Employes in War 
Service, One Missing in Action 


The Howe Seale company has an 
Honor Roll of f$4 employes who are 
serving in the armed forces. One 
young mam John Jagodzynski* 23* 
who formerly worked in the foun¬ 
dry, is listed as missing in action. 

Jagodzynski, who made Ms home 
with Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Shedd 
of Shedd place, since childhood, en¬ 
listed in the Army in ID40 and was 
bombardier in the Philippines 


at the time of the fall of Corregidor, 
when he was reported missing in 
action. His parents, Mr, and Mrs, 
Ignae Jagodzymki of Center Hut* 
land an* both dead, the former hav¬ 
ing died about two weeks before 
his son was reported missing, The 
mother died when John was born. 


iipi 




m&- \ 


JOHN JAGODZYNSKL 

A brother, Stanley, is also serv¬ 
ing with the armed forces over- 
[seat. Jagodzynsld attended Rutland 
frebool end was In the employ 
bf the Howe Scale company about 
* 3fcar before he entered the armed 
| forces. 

Three brothers who were all for- 
ner Howe Scale employes are also 


in service. Carmine, ji% Donald and 
Henri Pilamello, sons of Mr. and 
Mrs* Carmine Pitaniello of Forest 
street. One veteran of the first 
World war, Francis W* Pratt, is 
now a major in the Army, 

The company also claims one 
Women's Army Auxiliary corps 
candidate. Miss Harriet Hatch, 
daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Alexander 
O. Hatch of Litchfield avenue, She 
is awaiting induction orders and 
has not as yet left the employ of 
the company. 

The member of the Honor Roll, 
who gave the company the longest 
period of service was Hbddge 
Savage, who formerly was head 
bookkeeper at the offices. 

The complete honor roll is as 
follows: 1 

Missing in action: John Jagod- 
zynski; in service: Roy Alncs, Wil¬ 
liam F. Austin, Charles Alexander, 
Palmer J, Bashaw, Charles Blake¬ 
ly, Horace Brown, John Bruton 
Goff Buxton, John F. Carroll, Ralph 
Cioffi, George Congdon, Edward 
Courcelle, Fred Courcelle, George 
F. Cox, Ned Creed and Lawrence 
M Crist. 

Also Llewellyn L. Derby, Charles 
Dupre, Robert J. Dusckett, How¬ 
ard C. Farr, Arnold B, Franzont, 
Gordon Garvey, Robert K. Graham, 
Robert Guyette, Carl Guynup, Jo¬ 
seph F, Hannon, Roy E> Hannon, 
William Harvey* Harriet Hatch* 
(WAAC), William Hennings and 
Fred Jasmine, 

Also* John A. Johnson, Richard D. 
Kepple, Perry Lane, Clinton Mey¬ 
ers, Patsy MIgliori* Raymond C, 
Miles, William Morowski, Andrew 
Musella, Anthony Muse]la, Frank 
NienaltoFld, Joe Noluskf, Anthony 
J. Notte, John E, Orzechowskj, 
George P. Phalen and Joseph 
Fiontek. 

Also, Albert J, Piseopo* Carmine 
PiUmiello* Donald Fm&nello, Henri 
Pita niello, Franci* W. Pratt, Mike 
Prozxo, John Reardon, Zygmont 
S&nkowald* Elbridge Savage* Ar¬ 
thur Shorts! eeves. James C. Smith, 

H, Arthur Steele, Robert C. Stro- 
beli, C. E> White* C. E. Whittonj 
Douglas C, Williams and M, J 
Zidousky* 


























Personals 



Mrs, Joseph Mintzer of North 
Main street has returned after vis¬ 
iting her daughter and son-in-law, 
Lieut, and Mrs, George J. Havit of 
Bethesda, Md* She also visited 
friends in Washington and New 
York, ‘ ^ 

Mrs, A, J* Carlson of Manches¬ 
ter, N. H, t has returned after visit¬ 
ing Mrs, Clarence P, Barlow of Mar¬ 
ble avenue. 

Julian Gel van, a student at the 
University of Vermont, spent the 
week-end at his home on East Cen¬ 
ter street. 

Miss Barbara Burns and Miss Bar¬ 
bara Kertnon of Fort Carson, Colo*, 
both students at the University of 
Vermont, spent the week-end with 
Attorney and Mrs, Stanley L. Burns 
of porter street* 

Corp. Howard Shortsleeves, son 
of Mrs, Anna Shortsleeves of Al¬ 
len street, is now stationed at Fort 
Benning, Ga„ where he is taking a 
mechanical training course* 

Pvt Patsy Trapeni, who is sta¬ 
tioned in Stratford, Conn*, spent 
the week-end at his home on Plain 
street 

Miss Elizabeth Merry of Radcltffe 
college in Cambridge* Mass*, spent 
the week-end with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs, Charles F* Merry of Kings¬ 
ley avenue* 

Mrs* Joseph Perry of Belmont 
Mass., is visiting her daughter, Mre. 
BrmrretrTX Beli andlamily of Bill¬ 
ings avenue. 

Pie. Robert Da vine, who is sta¬ 
tioned at Miller Field, Staten Isl¬ 
and, N. Y„ spent the week-end with 
his parents* Mr, and Mrs. Robert 
Davine of East Washington street. 
Miss Katherine Lyons of Brattle- 
boro was also a week-end guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Davine, 

Corp, James J. Reilly of Camp 
Livingston, La., who has been at 
his home in Center Rutland on fur¬ 
lough* has gone to New York to 
visit relatives and friends before re¬ 
turning to Louisiana* 

Hubert J* Hamel, 3d class petty 
officer, son of Mr* and Mrs, E, P* 
Hamel of Charlestown, S* C*, has 
returned to his station at Pensacola, 
Fla*, after spending a few days at 
the home of a friend on Grove 
street, 

Philip Mayo* 3d class pharmacists 
mate, has returned to his post at 
Providence* E* I., after spending the 
week-end with his parents, Mr* and 
Mrs* Frank W. Mayo of Deer street. 

J* C* Biberdy of Jackson avenue 
has returned here from the Corey 
Hill hospital in Boston where he un¬ 
derwent several operations. His 
condition is satisfactory* 

Pvt Thomas Pierce of the Army 
Air corps has returned to his station 
In Atlantic Cjty after spending the 
week-end at his home on North 
Main street 

Capt and Mrs. Norman Matthews 
and daughter, Bonnie Jean are 
spending the week at the home of 
Capt Matthews’ parents, Mr* and 
Mrs* Lawrence Matthews of Lincoln 
avenue. 

Pvt Leon J. KantorsM of West 
Point N. Y. t has returned after 
^pending the week-end with Ms 
j parents, Mr, and Mrs. Zigmont 
Kantorski of Water street 










Rutland Soldier In 

Unique Unit in Italy 

CpL William Hollis of Forest 
street, and a “buddy/* CpL Murray 
E, Reynolds of Brattleboro, are 
highly trained technicians of a Field 
Artillery Observation battalion, 
which has located more than 4100 
enemy gun positions on the Fifth 
army front in Italy, leading to their 
destruction or withdrawal it has 
been announced from Fifth army 
headquarters in Italy* 

The only American unit of its 
kind In Italy, the battalion has em¬ 
ployed the most modem methods of 
locating enemy gun positions by 
flash and sound for more than 16 
months and has, at the same time, 
obtained and disseminated precise 
local and meteorological data, it 
was reported. 







<D DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 27, 1944. 



Three Outlaid men Arc shown above, just after they had met 
or a reunion in the New Guinea jungles. They arc, left to right* 
■Half Sgt. Carmine Facca, son of Mrs, Rose Ptetl of River street, 
t.1 Kay Burke, son of Mr. arid Mrs. Raymond F, Burke of Brown 
itrret and Staff 8ft Joseph Marottl* son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
HaroUi of Traverse place. The young men, childhood chums, ob¬ 
tained contact with each other the outcome of a statement in 
rhe tterald’a *'News from Homo’ 1 column, annminelng that U, 
Burke would like to get to touch with other servicemen from Rut¬ 
land and vtrinity* 










LAND DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY MORNING, FEBR1 


Library's River .St. ‘Station' 
Called Decidedly Successful 


The first library "station**, estab-j 
lished last summer by the Rutland; 
Free Library In Reardon’s Grocery 
at 101 River street for the conveni¬ 
ence of residents of the western j 
part of the city, has been a decided 
success. it has been announced by 
Miss Marlon Humble, library direc¬ 
tor. 

A small collection of about 50: 
books was sent to the store eight] 
months ago. after discussion with 
several persons of that vicinity and j 
with the Sisters of St Joseph about | 
a suitable location for a library sta- | 
tion in the neighborhood. Tne pro¬ 
ject was intended especially for 
mothers and children who might 
not find it convenient to walk to 
the library. The books have been 
changed several times, special re¬ 
quests have been filled and the cir¬ 
culation has been five or six books' 


a day* totalling about 775 books in 
eight months. 

Among the city-wide services ren¬ 
dered by the library in addition to 
providing books, magazines and cir¬ 
culars during the year have includ¬ 
ed ihe presentation *of talks and 
book exhibits at meetings of more 
than 25 schools and irganizalions:' 
the use and loan of recordings rang¬ 
ing from Gregorian chants for use, 
by the Mount St. Joseph Music de- j 
partment to songs of the Red army 
and Russian folk songs for Friends 
in Council; Spanish language rcc-| 
ord* for study at the library and by 
the Pittsford High school Spanish 
class, exhibits of books, pictures, 1 
paintings of Mid-Vermont Ar¬ 
tist*: prize winging posters, arts and 
crafts in the Library 1 Recreation 
room and the use of the library for 
meeting purposes by many Rutland 
organizations. 












**4U ... 


t 

fl 

tl 


Victory Ship Rutland in Pacific, 
Father of Crew Member Writes 


The name, Rutland*, means | 
something to A. Patterson of ! 
Medford, Mass., aside from the 
fact that, as a hardware me^- j 
chant, he deals in merchandise 
made here. In placing an order f 
with the Rutland Fir$ Clay 
company for one of its products, ! 
he 'wrote: 

"While I was writing your or¬ 
der, the name of Rutland stood 
out so J am writing this note. 

I do not know whether it is 
publicly known in your city but 
there is a Victory ship named 
after Rutland, Vt. * * * The 1 
third mate Is my son, Earl Pat¬ 
terson of Medford. He went to 
Portland, Ore., where the boat 1 
wan built and sailed on it from 
San Fraud see m May and they j 
now are on the Pacific some- ^ 


* • * 

where past^Pear] Harbor. I had 
a letter last week, and they were 
still out on the water, 

‘'I happened to be writing to 
him and the two Hutlands came 
to my mind so I wonder if this 
was a little news that would 
be of interest, Rutland being 
the name of a boat, helping to 
end the war as soon as possible." 

The 10,8004on 453-foot ship, 
■"Rutland Victory/*, was design¬ 
ed by the Maritime commission 
as one of a fleet of similar ships 
and was built by the Portland, 
Ore.. Ship Building corporation 
from whose ways it was launch¬ 
ed last May. life^ceremony being 
witnessed by three Vermonters 
on special invitation Vf she 
builders extended through the 
Rutland Chamber of Commerce. 


\ 











m *■» I »—* *~r 


TLAND DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 14, 1945, 



Herald Photo. 


Getting a lot of fun out of reading a book on how to raise 
a "bouncing boy/* Capt. and Mrs. Gilbert H. Fuller of Rutland are 
shown here in the best of spirits and for good reason: They are the 
parents of a son born Tuesday in Rutland hospital where this 
picture was taken yesterday. The Fullers have both done their 
share in World War If. Fuller, a native of Ludlow, was “mayor 
of Aachen** in Germany for several days until the Allied mili¬ 
tary government took over. Mrs. Fuller was her husband's Army 
nurse in England after he was seriously wounded in Germany. 
They were married early this year. (Story same page.) 


i Veteran of First Division Gets 


Double Thrill, Becoming Father 
And Civilian Again on Same Day 


l Capt. Gilbert H. Fuller, veteran 
infantry officer with the Army’s 
1st division, told yesterday at his 
Elm street home of his pleasure at 
becoming the proud father of a son 
bom Tuesday, and being discharged 
the same day from the Army. 

Capt. Fuller was waiting for 3 
o’clock when he could visit the Rut¬ 
land hospital to see his wife, Johna. 
and young John Patrick. Speaking 
of his long and dangerous Army 
service, Fuller said he would do it 
again despite the days in Tunisia, 
Sicily the Hurtgen forest. 

Capt. Fuller, bom and raised in 
Ludlow, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guy Fuller, entered the Army in 
early 19*1 as 1st sergeant of Com¬ 
pany B, 172d infantry. Soon nfter, 
he went to Officer’s Candidate 
school in Georgia and was assigned 
as a second lieutenant to the famed 
26th Infantry regiment of the 1st 
division. One of the first outfits to 
land in England, they made the in¬ 
itial landing at Oran in North Afri¬ 
ca. During the Tunisian campaign, 
one of the dark periods of the war, 
Capt. Fuller was twice wounded, 
nnre bv shell fire and once by *traf- 


on the beachhead at Gela. Sicily, 
the Bronze Star for heroism in Nor¬ 
mandy, the Purple Heart wifh three 
clusters, three Presidential citations, 
one for the Battle of the Bulge and 
one for the taking of Aachen, and 
the Belgian and French foura- 
guerres. 

Capt. Fuller expressed dissatis¬ 
faction with the way the point sys¬ 
tem worked, and also said that the 
rotation policy didn’t seem to touch 
the 1st division. 

"We had nothing to look forward 
to,” he said, “except the end of the 
war/* and added that many men 
grew to hope they woUidbe wouua- 
ed as the only way to get a rest 
from the continual nightmare. 

Enjoying civilian life again, Capt 
Fuller said that he has forgotten 
the work he knew before the war, 
and that he had thought of attend¬ 
ing college, but now hopes to go to 
work in January. He said he hopes 
to remain with his family in Rut¬ 
land. a place that looks pretty good 
to him. 


Then followed the invasion of 
Sicily in July of 1943, where he was 
wounded again and then the divi¬ 
sion was withdrawn to England for 
“a rest and training”, really in prep¬ 
aration for D-Day at Normandy. 
There the division had the misfor¬ 
tune to hit the heaviest opposition 
offered by the Germans. For the 
first time. Capt. Fuller’s regiment 
did not make the initial landing, 
which was done by the 16th infan¬ 
trymen, those few who survived 
receiving a Presidential citation for 
their work. 

Deciding that “it's better to die 
inland” than on the shell-swept 
beaches, the division pushed on to 
occupy a finger of land miles ahead 
of the British on their left at Caen 
and supporting units on the right. 
Here they held on grimly for 31 
days, absorbing the worst shellfire 
the Germans could muster. 

Then they went on to make the 
St Lo breakthrough with the 3d 
Armored division, through Belgium 
and across the frontier into Ger¬ 
many. 

It was in Aachen, first German 
city taken in the war, that Capt. 
Fuller became famous as the first 
mayor, a title which he held for 
three days, until the military gov¬ 
ernment could move in. Capt. Ful¬ 
ler discounts the importance of this 
office-holding saying he "didn’t 
have time to get involved in poli¬ 
tics” 

It was two days later, in the Hurt- 
gen forest area that he was serious¬ 
ly wounded, for the fourth time, by 
{ a tree-burst shell. He was flown to 
England and began to recover slow¬ 
ly at a hospital in Wales. It was 
there that he met the future Mrs. 
Fuller, 1st Lt. Johna Ferguson of 
Springfield, Mo., who nursed him 
back to health. They were married 
there as soon as Capt. Fuller had 
recovered his health, in March. 

Fulfilling the promise to himself 
that he “started with them and 
would finish with them,” Capt. Ful¬ 
ler rejoined his old company as the 
war was finishing. Though’he had 
a total of 158 points he did not leave 
for the United States until August. 
Mrs. Fuller arrived in ApriL 
Capt. Fuller’s decorations include 
the Combat Infantry badge, the Eu¬ 
ropean-Middle Eastern theater rib¬ 
bon with seven Battle Stars and 
three invasion Arrowheads, the 
American theater and Victory rib¬ 
bons, the Silver Star for gallantry 


I; 


P r-1.4 































Of AacBcn in uermany iur several nays uuui uir muca mili¬ 
tary government took over. Mrs. FoJIer was her husband’s Army 
nurse in England after he was seriously wounded in Germany. 
They were married early this year. (Story same page.) 


Veteran of First Division Gets 
Double Thrill, Becoming Father 
And Civilian Again on Same Day 


Capt. Gilbert H. Fuller, veteran 
infantry officer with the Army’s 
1st division, told yesterday at his 
Elm street home of his pleasure at 
becoming the proud father of a son, 
born Tuesday, and being discharged 
the same day from the Army. 

Capt Fuller was waiting for 3 
o’clock when he could visit the Rut¬ 
land hospital to see his wife, Johna. 
and young John Patrick. Speaking 
of his long and dangerous Army 
service, Fuller said he would do it 
[again despite the days in Tunisia, 
Sicily end the Hurtgen forest 
I Capt Fuller, born and raised in 
Ludlow, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guv Fuller, entered the Army in 
early 1941 as 1st sergeant of Com¬ 
pany B. I72d infantry. Soon after, 
he went to Officer’s Candidate 
school in Georgia and was assigned 
as a second lieutenant to the famed 
26th Infantry regiment of the 1st 
division. One of the first outfits to 
land in England, they made the in¬ 
itial landing at Oran in North Afri¬ 
ca. During the Tunisian campaign, 
one of the dark periods of the war. 
Capt Fuller was twice wounded, 
once toy shell fire and once toy straf 
ing. , , . 

Then followed the invasion of 
Sicily in July of 1943, where he was 
wounded again and then the divi¬ 
sion was withdrawn to England for 
“a rest and training*’, really in prep¬ 
aration for D-Day at Normandy. 
There the division had the misfor¬ 
tune to hit the heaviest opposition 
offered by the Germans. For the 
first time* Capt. Fullers regiment 
did not make the initial landing, 
which was done by the 16th infan¬ 
trymen, those few who survived 
receiving a Presidential citation foT 
their work. 

Deciding that “it’s better to die 
inland” than on the shell-swept 
beaches, the division pushed on to 
occupy a finger of land miles ahead 


on the beachhead at Gela, Sicily, 
the Bronze Star for heroism in Nor¬ 
mandy, the Purple Heart wifh three 
clusters, three Presidential citations, 
one for the Battle of the Bulge and 
one for the taking of Aachen, and 
the Belgian and French foura- 
guerres. 

Capt. Fuller expressed dissatis¬ 
faction with the way the point sys¬ 
tem worked, and also said that the 
rotation policy didn’t seem to touch 
the 1st division. 

“We had nothing to look forward 
to.” he said, “except the end of the 
war,” and added that many men 

grew to hope they wouldoe wound¬ 
ed as the only way to get a rest 
from the continual nightmare. 

Enjoying civilian life again, Capt. 
Fuller said that he has forgotten 
the work he knew before the war, 
and that he had thought of attend¬ 
ing college, but now hopes to go to 
work in January. He said he hopes 
to remain with his family in Rut¬ 
land, a place that looks pretty good 
to him. 


of the British on their left at Caen | 
and supporting units on the right, i 
Here they held on grimly for 31 
days, absorbing the worst shellfire |l 
the Germans could muster. 

Then they went on to make the II 
St Lo breakthrough with the 3d | 
Armored division, through Belgium 
and across the frontier into Ger¬ 


many. | 

It was in Aachen, first German! 
city taken in the war, that Capt. 
Fuller became famous as the first! 
mayor, a title which he held for I 
three days, until the military gov¬ 
ernment could move in. Capt. Ful-I 
ler discounts the importance of tHis' 
office-holding saying he “didn’t | 
have time to get involved in poll- 1 
tics.” 

It was two days later, in the Hurt- 1 
gen forest area that he was serious-1 
ly wounded, for the fourth time, by ] 
a tree-burst shell. He was flown to ] 
England and began to recover slow¬ 
ly at a hospital in Wales. It was I 
there that he met the future Mrs.] 
Fuller. 1st Lt. Johna Ferguson ofi 
Springfield, Mo., who nursed him| 
back to health. They were married 
there as soon as Capt Fuller had! 
recovered his health, in March. 

Fulfilling the promise to himself 
that he “started with them and 
would finish with them,” Capt. Ful-1 
ler rejoined his old company as the 
war was finishing. Though he had 1 
a total of 158 points he did not leave ! 
for the United States until August 
Mrs. Fuller arrived in April. 

Capt Fuller’s decorations include 
the Combat Infantry badge, the Eu -1 
ropean-Middle Eastern theater rib¬ 
bon with seven Battle Stars and 
three invasion Arrowheads, the 
American theater and Victory rib¬ 
bons, the Silver Star for gallantry 






I 






















SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 19, 1945, 


[Herald Staff 
Member Dies; 


| 'Bcckv* Wilson, Wife of Asso¬ 
ciated Press War Correspond¬ 
ent, Was Ludlow Native. 


Mrs. Robert C. Wilson, 27, of 10 
I Woodstock avenue, well-known 
I Rutland newspaperwoman and wife 
I of the Associated Press War cor- 
I respondent "Sob" Wilson, who ha*! 
[been on duty in the European i 
•3 for the past several mn-iifi- 
Idled suddenly yesterday morning 
I at 10:20 o'clock at the Rutland hos- 
I pltaL 


mm 




MRS, ROBERT C. WII>SON. 

Mr*. Wilson, the former E- Re¬ 
becca (Becky! Davis, was born In 
Ludlow, December 23, 1017. daugb- 
ter of Clarence J, and Margaret 
Townsend Davis. She was educated 
in the Ludlow schools and was 
graduated from Black River aca¬ 
demy in im On June 27, 1040, she 
was married at the historic Fed¬ 
erated church in Castlttoo to Rob¬ 
ert C. Wilson, who had recently 
transferred from the Rutland Her¬ 
ald staff to a Holyoke, Mass.* news¬ 
paper. 

The couple lived al Holyoke and 
later In Albany, N. Y., and Syra¬ 
cuse* N* Y. Mr, Wilson volunteered 
for service as a war correspondent 
when he was chief of the Associat¬ 
ed Press bureau in Syracuse. When,, 
he left for overseas service, Mm r 
Wilson became a member of the , 
news staff of the Rutland Herald* 
more than a year ago. 

Mrs, Wilson was society ed&or for 
the Herald and during the winter 
months wrote several articles on 
skiing. 

In March, live stood by the tele¬ 
type machine in The Herald news 
room and watched the keys taps out 
the story of how her husband nar¬ 
rowly escaped death while traveling 
in a troop carrier plane during the 
great Allied offensive across the 
Rhine, The plane was hit by enemy 
flak and Wilson was forced to para¬ 
chute into German territory as the] 
rm feet | 


















—----1-- 

RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH 5, 1941. 


i. '• — -:----——--—— ~— --- 


Shown above are the officers and men of Company E* 118th Medics! Regiment, 4Hd Division, of Wallingford, stationed at their home armory in Wallingford* The first 
section of Company E left Wallingford yesterday in the motor convoy, which assemble cl from the various Vermont units in that town. The section of Company L\ which left 
yesterday was comprised of Capi, South worth, M. C,, Staff fiergt Mondeila* Corp. Bo lgioni and 19 men. The second section* which will go by rail will be made up of €apt 
Munson, Headquarters, 2d Battalion, Staff Sergt. Walters, Sergt Bolgionl. Corp. Hard a nd 12 men. These men leave on Friday, The main body of the company, the last to 
leave, will entrain March 12, This section will be made up of the remainder of the no it-cotnmissioned officers. Technical Sergt, MacFarlane, Staff Sergt Collins, Scrgts, Fer¬ 
guson, Knight and Clark and eight men under Capt, Eddy, commanding officer. Th e company is one of two companies in the regiment under the command of Lieut, Coh 
ts. A, Cooley of Rutland, who will accompany the main body March 12, 

The officers and men appearing in the picture, are, left to right: Back row, X 0* Weaver of West Rutland, R. Q. Eddy of Rutland, E. F* Wade of Wallingford, L, A. 
Pratt of Belmont, D. E* Kenyon of Rutland, R, C* Kelley of Danby* D. M, Bossa, G, F. € oltey, M. H, Belock, G, W, Batchelder and F. J. Ross of Rutland; second row'* W. L. 

Chioffi, F, C, Ryan, D, R, Perry, E, C* Badger of Rutland; F, C> Stack of Walllngfor d; J. E, Hesse, R. N, Riley of Rutland* F* J, Bliss of Wallingford, J. E, Edmunds, W* B. 

Stratton, G, P, McMahon of Rutland, M. A, Pehme of Belmont, H, A, Walters, R* M. Ja %min f R, P. Cioffi, C, L, Jasmin, H. J, Hove, C. T, Gallagher, G, B. Euo and J. J. Fdart 

«r Rutland, W* R* Macfarlane, G, J, Stack and F. E. Reed of Wallingford; P. J* Basha w. A- D. Paul of Rutland, H. J. Gradxlel of W est Rutland, K, H, Cnolirigc, Rutland, A* 

A* Devereaux of Belmont and G. ,L Morrello of Rutland. 

Front row. Corp. T. F, Hard. Staff Sergts, K. C. Collins of Wallingford, L, TV M ondella and H, E, Waiters of Rutland; First Sergt, Albert Macfaxlane of Wallingford, 
Capts. Robert A, Eddy and John D, SowtfmorLh of Rutland, ScrgU. tt, C. Clark of W*1 Hngford, L, ft. Holginiti And F, F, Knight of Rutland, A, F* Ferguson of Wallingford and 
Corp, R, R- Bolgioni of Rutland, 




























SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 19. 1945. 


Herald Staff 
I Member Dies 


‘Becky 5 Wilson, Wife of Asso¬ 
ciated Press War Correspond¬ 
ent, Was Ludlow Native* 

Mrs, -Robert a Wil*on t 27. of 10 
[ Woodstock avenue, well-known 
Rutland newspaperwoman and wife 
[of the Associated Press war cor- 
I respondent ‘Bob" Wilson, who has 
I been on duty in the European 
I ■! for the past several months, 
Idled suddenly yesterday morning 
L 10:20 o'clock at the Rutland hos- 
1 pitaL 


MRS, ROBERT C, WILSON. 

Mrs. Wilson, the former E. Rc^ 
becea (-Becky) Davis, was born in 
Ludlow, December 23, 1917. daugh¬ 
ter of Clarence J, and Margaret 
Townsend Davis, She was educated 
in the Ludlow schools and was 
graduated from Black River aca¬ 
demy in im. On June 27, 1940, she 
wss married at the historic Fed¬ 
erated church in Castletgn to Rob¬ 
ert C, Wilson, who had recently 
transferred from the Rutland Her¬ 
ald staff to a Holyoke, Mass,, news¬ 
paper. 

The couple lived a I Holyoke and 
later fn Albany, N Y„ and Syra¬ 
cuse, N. Y. Mr, Wilson volunteered 
fur service as a war correspondent 
when he was chief of the Associat¬ 
ed Presfl bureau in Syracuse. When 
he left for overseas service. Mrs 
Wilson became a member of the 
news sftiitf of the Rutland Herald, 
more than a year ago. 

Mo. Wilson was society edijor for 
the Herald and during the winter 
months wrote several article a on 
skiing. 

la March, she stood by the tele¬ 
type machine in The Herald news 
room and watched the keys taps out 
Ike story of how her husband nar¬ 
rowly escaped death while traveling 
in a troop carrier plane during the 
great Allied offensive across the 
Rhine. The plane was hit by enemy 
flak and Wilson was forced to para¬ 
chute into German territory as the 
blazing plane was about 000 feet 
from the ground. He had several] 
narrow escapes from death on the 
a British Tommy mis¬ 
took him fur a German and almost 
shot him, 

"And to think that I believed he 
was safe In Farter she commented 
as she read the end of the story. 

Mrs. Wilson had planned to join 
her husband in Paris as soon as 
trans-Atlantic travel restrictions 
were lifted. 

Besides her husband, and her 
parents, who live in Ludlow, Mrs. 
Wilson is survived by one sister, 
Mrs, P, A, Stryhus of Ludlow; two 
brothers. Aviation Cadet Justin C. 
Davis of Williams Field. Ariz., and 
John Davis of Ludlow; a niece, 
Peggy Ann Stryhas and a nephew, 
Bruce Stryha* of Ludlow She also 
leaves three aunte* Mrs. Allen 
Fletcher of Ludlow-, Mrs. Carl Pratt 
of CuttlngsvtUe and Mm Henry 
Meeker of Vancouver, B. C. 

The body was moved to the L, A 
Spaulding Funeral home in Ludlow 
and will be taken this morning to 
the home of her parents in the same 
town. 

Funeral arrangements had not 
been completed last night, pending 
contact with Mrs Wilson's husband 
who is now attached to the A wel¬ 
ted Pntsi bureau In Paris. 






















Herald Photo—-Merusi 
Capt, Peter ValPreda, SB, w ho spent nearly a year as a Nazi 
war prisoner, thumps his chest on the porch of his Marble avenue 
home as he fills his lungs w ith good Vermont air* With him are his 
wife, the former Charlotte Barlow, and their baby daughter whom 
he saw for the first time early this week, (Story same page.) 

Concern About Families At 
Home One of Major Topics 
Among Allied W ar Prisoners 

By HELEN McLAUGHLLN 

Concern about their families and friends back in the United States, 
speculation, on when they would be released by victorious Allied forces 
and wondering what was being done in their home communities to bring 
about economic security after the war. 

These, according to Capt. Peter ValPreda, £8. of 26 Marble avenue, 
Eighth Air Force bomber pilot just arrived home after his release from 
a Nan prison camp, were the main topics of conversation among Amer¬ 
ican prisoners during endless days of internment. 

The airman, who was picked up 


in the Baltic sea after his plane was 
badly crippled over Berlin, says he 
is delighted at accomplishments 
made here in the development, thus 
far, of Rutland Airport. Although 
he wants to see the war “through 
to the finish," he anticipates 
career In air transportation, and 
states that he looks to Rutland to 
share in the future of the aviation 
business. He was the first service¬ 
man to land a plane at the Munici 
pal airport in Clarendon after its 
completion. 

Capt, Valpreda is spending the 
early part of his 60-day leave iu 
siting acquainted with his tiny 
daughter, Diana Joan, born at Rut¬ 
land hospital a week after he was 
listed as "missing in action," and 
who will celebrate her first birth 
day on June 27, Mrs. ValFreda Is 
the former Charlotte Barlow of this 
eily. The officer is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs, "Joe* ValPreda of East 
Wallingford, He has been overseas 
for more than a year and a half. 

As pilot of a B-24 bomber just a 
year ago, his plane was hit by fire 
from Nazi planes during a bombing 
raid over an oil refinery near Ber¬ 
lin,. He emphasizes that later in 
the raid United States planes thor 
I ’ Tit*hlr witrprt out the refinery, 

1 It happened to be Capt, ValPreda’s 
turn to lead the air force group that 
I morning, and his bomber was hit 
at 22.000 feet by three waves of Ger 
I man rockets, fired from twin en 
j gine planes, after the B-24 had run 
I through a flak barrage which crip¬ 
pled several other American heavy 
bombers. Four gunners in his crew 
were killed, and the radio operator, 
Tech, Sgt. Walter J. McKean of 
New Jersey, had his leg blown off. 

The B-24 went into a spin, its con* 
trok shot out, and he attempted 
,i to bring the craft over [he border 
■ into Swedish territory. As flames 
I licked Ihe inside of the plane the 
I injured radio operator was rigged 
up in a parachute and bailed oul 
over land, and the bombardier and 
two navigators followed a short 
time later. Sgt. McKean, the ra¬ 
dioman, was captured, hospitalized 
and later repatriated on the Grips- 
holm. 

VaiFreda. his co-pilot, Dt. Carey 
Walton of Wilmington, N. C, f and 
ihe engineer. Tech. Sgt. Nello Cen¬ 
to ri of New York, were forced to 
jump at £000 feet, as ihe spreading 
fire made it Impossible io stay with 
the plane longer. They landed in 


the Baltic sea just 30 miles from 
Sweden and were picked up by a 
German navy patrol boat. ValPreda 
says that he has since learned that j 
all members of his crew who bailed 
out are safe. 

The crew of the Nazi navy boat 
paid no attention to the two flyers 
they had picked out of the cold sea 
waters, other than stripping them 
of their possessions. The pair were 
locked up in a local jail in the vi¬ 
cinity of Rostok, They received no 
food until night when they -were 
offered potatoes only. Later Val- 
Preda and his co-pilot were march¬ 
ed bo a railroad station and placed 
in a freight car with three other 
prisoners and carried toward Bei¬ 
lin, As they neared the German I 
capital, rail installations were be¬ 
ing heavily bombed by American 
planes, and the Nazi military guards I 
and train crew ran into nearby 
woods for safety, leaving ihe pris¬ 
oners to their tale in the locked 
cars, according to the officer. "The 
bombs came, pretty close, they hit 
the railroad station and main gov¬ 
ernment buildings/' he said. 

After the raid the prisoners were 
marched five miles down the tracks, 

Mst Meekigi ijfilii ftsj 

another tram of box cars which 
took them to Frankfurt, On the 
second day the party of five pris¬ 
oners was given one loaf of bread 
and a small piece of blood sausage 
They declined the latter but later' 
would have been glad to have it 
tne captain declared, 

Frtrni a jail at Frankfurt they 
were moved to a main prison camp 
Stalag Luft 3 at Sagan, after under¬ 
going a German interrogation about' 
air groups in England. The at¬ 
tempts io obtain information were' 
unavailing. Asked what the "melh- 
interr *£ation" consisted of, 
VarPreda replied, "Oh, throwing us 
mto stone cells full of Rce for two 1 
or three days and forgetting about 
us,' During this period they were | 
given a slice of black bread in the 
morning and two slices with water! 
in the evening. 

At Staiag Luft 3, the American 1 
Red Cross was the main standby of 
the American prisoners. Here the I 
United States airmen were guarded 
by the Luftwaffe whose treatment 
was fair although the Rutland man 
said that shootings of prisoners in ! 
the camp prior kj his arrival had 
been rumored. 

During the Russian advance on 
January 27, the prisoners were 
mored, in freezing winter weather 
! through snow, clad in light foot- 
| wear, no gloves, overcoats provided 
by the Red Cross and many wear- 
| mg no headwear, on one of the fa- I 
, mous "forced marches," At Sprem- 
jburg they hoarded box cars to 
Moos burg camp, north of Munich 
This was e Wehrmacht or German ' 
army, camp for prisoners of all na- 
1 fcionalities. 

In this overcrowded camp the 
food was much worse than at the 
first camp, medical care was "nil" 
except for Wiiat interned doctors 
could do, no medical supplies were 
available and straw which served 
for mattresses on the rows of 
shelves was filled with fleas and 
lC ^ acCOrdin £ t0 Ca ^* VaUPreda 
The men were allowed to take a 
| shower when they first entered 
| Moosburg, and another after 70 
I days. Their most welcome gift be¬ 
sides the Red Cross food packages, 
was a box of louse powder, one for 
I each man, from the YMCA in 
March, At Moosburg Capt Val- 
Preda frequently saw Capt, Harold 
Hillman, husband of the former 
Miss Sue Woodfin of Pleasant street. 

As the American Army drove to¬ 
ward the Moosburg camp the 
prisoners were jubilant when they 
iieard the heavy artillery, a day or 
so ahead of their release. The Ger¬ 
mans made an effort to defend the 
area, then there was general con 
fusioo as the ss troops staged a 
figm among themselves, many in 
their attempts to run away The 
prisoners were wild with joy as a 
tank outfit from Gen. Patton’s Third 
Army crashed the gales of the 
camp. 

Capt, Va IP red a went yesterday 
afternoon to Brattlebom to visit the 
wife of the driver of one of the 
first tanks to liberate the prisoners 
;3l iMoOsuurg, Tech. Sgt. Howard 
j Dex ter, 

Capt. YalPreda, a graduate of 
Mount St, Joseph academy in 1641 
saw four years of service In the 
| Navy before reiurning to complete 
hie high echoo] course. 






































fa*LAND DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY I, 1944 


Nazis No Pu shover, Warns Young 
Proctor Officer Wounded in Italy | 


Lieut George Galo, 21. one of the 
three servicemen sons of Mr, and 
Mrs, George Galo o! Proctor, home 
on sick leave after being wounded 
in Italy, says he finds a general 
feeling among the "folks back here*' 
that the Allied light against Ger¬ 
many may let up soon* 


LIEUT, GEORGE GALO* 

Speaking as one who knows, he 
warns that the Germans have 3 
rood army, good soldiers and mighty 
fine equipment. Just as an ex* 
ample, he says their light machine 
gun is better than that of the 
Americans, firing 1200 rounds a 
minute. He also mentions the Ger¬ 
man six-barrelled mortar, electri¬ 
cally fired, sending out six rounds 
at once, or one at a time, the shell 
making accordion-like sounds as ft 
screams through the air. 

It was a German sniper who 
wounded Lieut Galo through the 
shoulder as the Proctor man was 
assaulting the small town of St 
Maria Olivette in a dawn attack 
on November 4. Galo had landed 
in Salerno alter the initial invasion, 
and participated In the first battle 
of Avelino* His battalion took 
Bonevento flat, and had gone 
through Piedmont d'Allfe to the 
right of Venefro* 

Lieut Gain's platoon had crossed 
the Volturno and was approaching 
II its objective, with artillery support, 

I Fifty yards from the first house, “a 
Jerry got me through the shoulder/* 
Alt houses of the towns were full of 
German snipers, he explained. 

When Lieut. Galo was wounded, 
he says, he fell backward* behind a 
terrace, and the German approached 
with a concussion grenade. My 
platoon sergeant—his name was 


Slawson from Iowa—saw my predl- 
earnest and brought fire on the 
house. I crawled back 50 yards, and 
the platoon medics came to my 
rescue with sulfanulamide and first 
aid. Our chaplain, Lieut Huffman, 
assisted me back of the line, and on 
our way we patched up communica¬ 
tion lines that had been blown up. 
The first aid station where I was 
being treated was under fire 
throughout the rest of the day. 

Later I was taken to an evacua¬ 
tion hospital behind the lines, then 
I was flown from Naples to BJzerte ( 
and later was taken back to the 
States," 

“Incidentally, our men took the 
town the day after I was wounded," 
Lieut Galo boasts. 

The Proctor officer re-iterates 
that the mountainous terrain, rain 
and mud make the going tough. 
However, he adds, -'the snipers are 
the only good shots," 

Lieut Gain’s parents are natives \ 
of Czech©-Slovakia, and from them 
he derived a good knowledge of the 
Polish language* When his battalion 
took Polish, Luxembourg and 
Slovak prisoners, he was able to 
converse with many of them* who 
stated that they had been forced to 
fight for Germany, and were glad to 
be delivered Into Allied hands. 

The German prisoners, with whom 
he had come in contact, were more 
often silent and sullen, he declared. 

The American soldiers lived on 
sea rations all of the time that he 
was in Italy, Lieut* Galo said. The 
Italian people were happy to see 
them as they marched through the 
towns and when possible greeted 
them with wine and fruit The Ger¬ 
mans had routed them from their 
houses, leaving many to die from 
exposure and starvation In the hills. 
Cattle had been slaughtered and 
bodies were still in the wreckage of 
bombed buildings, while every¬ 
where natives were dying of disease. 

The Allied soldiers made their 
quarters in fox holes outside of 
towns, the Proctor man said. A sight; 
that impressed him was when the 
Italian women, children and aged 
waved replicas of American flags 
which they had made* 

Lieut Galo has two brothers, 
John and Paul, fighting with the 
Navy, After 30-day sick leave with 
his parents* and his wife* the 
former Theresa Bartholic of Flor¬ 
ence, he expects to return to Moore 
General hospital in North Carolina. 

Lieut Galo enlisted In Rutland 
early in 1940. He served with the 
ski troops* and was commissioned 
at Fort Berming, Ga* He was sent 
overseas as a replacement officer, 
stationed first at Aran, Africa. He 
wears the Purple Heart, the "pre- 
Pearl Harbor" service ribbon and 
the Europcan-African campaign rib¬ 
bon* 
























RUTLAND DAILY HERALD, SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 24, 1945. 



Herald Photo 

Above is Park street in Proctor, only 150 fee t long:, which is believed to be the shortest street 
in New England with the largest number of men and women in the armed service. 14 men and one 
woman. (Story below.) 


Few Proctor Servicemen 
To Come Home After War 


BY JANE MeYAGGABT 

The majority of the 15 servicemen from an unpretentious Proctor 
street, only 150 feet in length, are not coming back to their home town 
after the war. 

Even though these sons will not make Park street their post-war 
home, their parents do not censure them, but continue to work side by 
side id the factory, discussing occasionally the latest news from them all 

“You can't blame the young fel-* 


lows for getting out of Vermont," 
said A. H, Lrundberg to Henry Col¬ 
lin, a neighbor who resides at the 
very end of the street, and chief 
engineer of the Vermont Marble 
company. They often sit together 
for their 20-minute lunch in the 
crowded plant cafeteria. 

“When they have had the op¬ 
portunity of a better education than 
I had, you can understand their de¬ 
sire to venture out," he added, 

Lund'berg. who has lived in Ver¬ 
mont for 44 years, says he would 
not trade his modest home and its 
memories of his boys for any price. 

There is a bond between the little 
Swede in the brown worksweater 
with his throaty accent, and his 
erudite luncheon companion. Both 
are fathers of Annapolis graduates, 

Lundberg s older son, Harry, who 
was graduated some years ago from 
the Naval academy was only recent¬ 
ly liberated on Mindanao in the 
Philippines islands, 

Lt, Malcolm Collin is now serving 
in the Pacific after graduating last 
year, Capt Einar Lutidberg, another 
son, is a doctor in the European 
theater, 

Collin agrees with the theory that 
many boys will leave the state af¬ 
ter the war, 

His own^soix will remain in the 
Navy. “However, in traveling, I 
have heard many businessmen ex¬ 
press the desire to make Vermont 
their home in a few years. It will 
bring capital here as well as men of 
better than average intelligence," 
he stated. 

Substantiating Collin's belief that 
there will be an influx of new peo¬ 
ple to Vermont, Ltmdberg reflected 
that he thought many people from 
all over the country, some of them 
badly-injured war veterans would 
reclaim the abandoned farms of 
the state, another compensation for 
those who will make their home 
elsewhere. 

Leaving the cafeteria they ex¬ 
changed a few words with another 
of the Park street parents, a frail 
little woman* Mrs. Edwin Swann. 
Her son is a corporal now inside 
Germany with a heavy maintenance 
company, 

“As I live all alone," she explain¬ 
ed. *T do so want my boy to come 
borne and settle down in Proctor. 
Bui he has learned a great deal 
about machines while in the service 
and wishes to lake advantage of the 
G-I Bill of Rights and to go on with 
his training when the war is over. 

“After that, though, he will come 
back to Proctor I'm sure. After all. 
be was bom and brought up here!'* 

Another Park street mother who 
will be less fortunate is Mrs. 
Severus Westin. All her four sons 
and one daughter are in the serv¬ 
ice, Mrs. Weslin expects that the 
daughter only, will reside in Proc¬ 
tor after the war. 

One of her boys, Lt. Benjamin 
Westin* is now home on an over¬ 
seas leave after serving with the 
12th Air force in Italy, Eager to 
tell him of their adventures, she 
enumerated the accomplishments of 
her other Children, 

Lt. Comdr, Howard Westin, 32, is 
her oldest boy, another one of Park 
street's Annapolis graduates and a 
recipient of the Navy Cross. Al¬ 
though seriously wounded in 1IH2, 
he has now recovered and is serving 
with the Na% T y, personnel depart¬ 
ment 

When he has been discharged 


from the Navy, he plans to take 
civil service job in Washington. 

A l bird son Is a doctor, Lt George 
W, Westin, now medico on a de¬ 
stroyer in the Pacific. Completing 
Internship just prior to his enlist¬ 
ment, he will specialize in osteo¬ 
pathic surgery someday in Hoches¬ 
ter, N, Y.* where he interned. 

Donald, a Navy pilot, is now in 
Florida after completing his tour of 
missions and after the war will 
probably resume his old job, as 
teacher in a New York state school. 

Both Donald and his twin sister 
are lieutenants. Dorothy is an Army 
nurse and has spent two years in 
New Zealand. 

Mrs. Westin is comforted by the 
fact that she wiU return to Ver¬ 
mont and continue her former work 
as a public health nurse, according 
to her letters. 

One housL! separates the Westin: 
from the Fregosis, who came U 
Proctor directly from their native 
home in Carrara, Italy. Mrs. Frego 
si spread out the framed dtplomaj 
of her two sons, her long finger 
caressing each one. 

“My boys, such good boys, thej 
are. They wdl come back to Ver 
mont This is their home," Her eye 
swept with a treasuring glance he; 
familiar living room wiLb its mar 
ble decorations, the handiwork o: 
her husband, a carver for the Ver 
mont Marble company, 

Lt. Comdr, Henry Frege si was i 
practising physician in Rutland be 
fore he entered the service as i 
Marine doctor. His brother, Lt. A1 
bert Freges i, was graduated Iron 
the University of Vermont Medi 
cal school in December, I&43, and i 
now on his way to Burma. 

While his older brother was ii 
California, he received word tha 
the family were thinking of rent 
ing dje house and going out there 

Immediately he wired; 

“Go wherever you 'want but don' 
rent our house , * , ever/' Hi; 
mother feels that he will undoubt 
edly practice jn Vermont eventu 
ally. 

The Fregosis have an adoptei 
son in service, too, Cpl. Edwari 
FregosL Another serviceman am 
Park street resident is Cpl. Toge; 
Erickson, of Fort Edward, Mass 
who plans to go back to the Ver 
mont Marble company's employ 
when ihe war is over. 

Another mother who does war- 
work while her sons are away, is 
Mrs. John Young. An officeworker 
for Proctor's factory, she, loo, re¬ 
alizes that her sons have larger am¬ 
bitions than Proctor can fulfill 
Capt. Earl Young barely finished 
college before going into the serv¬ 
ice where he works with an anti¬ 
aircraft division. 

His brother, Cpl. Young, has writ¬ 
ten that special training in survey¬ 
ing received while in the service, 
has decided his future for him. 
Fresh out of high school before en¬ 
listment, he wiU continue studying 
in his chosen field when he gets 
home. 

Hi* officers are helping him with 
correspondent courses even now, 
while he Is surveying for gun em¬ 
placements inside Germany, 

If the small-town street, only 150 
feet in length, can be any criterion, 
parents throughout the country will 
still be writing letters to their boys 
after the war; many of those same 
sons being men who were previous¬ 
ly satisfied with the opportunities! 
their home towns afforded. 
























[Manning In 
Hospital As 
Blast Result 

Roy A. Manning, 53. of 500 Park 
I avenue, manager of Manning's Fill* 
ling station and treasurer of Man* 

I rung ManuCacluring company, was 
[taken to the Eulland Hospital yc- c - 
Iterday morning for treatment for 
I burns sustained in an explosion in 
Ian oil burner furnace in the bai¬ 
lment of his home. 

1 According to firemen. Manning 
I was standing in front of the furnace 
I which he had just ignited, when tt 
1 red. blowing snot and the 

I blaze into his face. Members of 
I she Rutland Fire department were 
I summoned and administered first 
laid. The cellar windows were open- 
I ed for ventilation. 

1 Dr, Francis E, Quigley, a 
Ibor, was summoned by firemen and 
1 took the injured man to the Rut- 
hand hospital* Manning Usi night 

I 

)ums to his face and leP hand 






Playgrounds 
Cost $2204! 


Aldermen Hear Report onl 
Summer's Activities, Get| 
Recommendations. 


The five playground* in the city, I 
having a staff of nioe tostepnctorsJ 
under the direction of Leo F, KeefeJ 
supervisor, were operated during! 
the nine-week summer season at! 
a cost of $2204 35, It was revealed] 
in a report submitted to the board! 
of aldermen last night by Harry I 
M, Johnson, chairman of the parks 
and playgrounds committee. I 

The board approved expenses of 
$61.20 to be paid to Supervisor 
Keefe for the use of h is car in trav¬ 
eling 1 m miles in the course of his 
duties, The total playground ap¬ 
propriation was $2300, 

In Keefe’s report to the commit¬ 
tee and to the board* he suggested 
that an annual appropriation of 
$2500 be made for playgrounds. 
This, he explained* would allow 
about $700 to be spent each year 
for new standard equipment antlj 
on replacing other equipment Be 
said that the salaries of the in* 
structors and supervisors could re¬ 
main about the same In 1645 as in] 
1044. 

Supervisor Keefe's recommenda¬ 
tion for next year and 
years was to increase the quantity I 
of standard equipment He pointed I 
out that more equipment is needed! 
to keep younger children activated. 1 
According to the report all five] 
plavgrounds at present are equip¬ 
ped with swing structures; four I 
playgrounds have teeter-totter a- 1 
and Park street has a mini- 1 
dtUT* slide, Keefe suggested that] 
all playgrounds have medium sized] 
slides, Dana and School street f 
have giant slide structures, but lackl 
the swing steps needed for th- I 
the report stated, j 

One of the types of playground] 
equipment recommended by Keefe 
ia the self-propelled merry-go- 
round, capable of sealing as many I 
as 35 children. All of this equip-l 
meat cannot be secured in m I 
but could be obtained ill i ' I 
years if plans were set up and an I 
attempt made to achieve as much aa! 
possible every year, according to the] 
supervisor. I 

Keefe termed the pagt season] 
“very successful** and voiced an* I 
recialien to the members of his] 
ff. whose efficiency be praised* ( 






Ill 




UTLAND DAILY HERALD, 


Bu tterball 
Has Time For 
R eflectio 


Every dog has its day* and it 
was a big day for Buttertoall 
when he saw himself in a mir¬ 
ror for the first time in his life 
while he was investigating the 
scales in the Rutland railroad 
station waiting room yesterday 
afternoon. 

Service in the waiting room 
was nearly disrupted when the 
4Vi -month-old Chinese Chow 
puppy first caught a glimpse of 
a mysterious and elusive crea¬ 
ture just like himself and spent 
several fruitless minutes trying 
to induce it to come out of its 
glass cage and play with him. 

Bu tterball* who Is the prop¬ 
erty of Capt E. A. Sankari of 
Burlington, was bom on board 
ship one day out of Shanghai* 
on September L Because his 
mother died when lie was six 
days old* trying to protect him 
and his brothers and sisters 
from the curiosity rfj two other 
dogs on board, the puppy was 
raised on a diet of cahned milk, 
sugar and water, fdd to him 
from a beer bottle. I 

The only surviving member 
of his family* except for a fa¬ 
ther "somewhere in China/* 
ButterbaO, with Capjt. Sankari, 
was en route to BurjUngton af¬ 
ter almost four months in 
Japan. 

It was possible to bring the 
dog with him, the captain stat¬ 
ed, because of a receir m J_ 
partment amendmerj 
forn^er ban on brii 
hack from overseas* 
forced many servil 
leave their cherishefd mascot* 
behind when they 
this country. 











RHS Band T< 
[Give Concer 

[Tuesday Nigh 

— 

The first annual spring band con A 
cert is to be presented by the Rut-| 
land High school concert band* at 
the high school auditorium* tomor-l 
row night beginning at 8:15 o'clockj 
There is to be a matinee this after-l 
noon at 2:30 o'clock for students* il| 
was announced yesterday. 

The band* which consists of 421 
pieces, is directed by George H. 
Low, Since the band was organized 
many changes have been made* in- 1 
eluding a radical alteration in thel 
instrumentation of the band, it is] 
reported. The number of brass in-I 
struments has been cut down to anl 
approximation of the number used! 
in a symphony orchestra* and thel 
woodwinds have been Increased to I 
the point where they become to the] 
band what the strings are to the or-| 
chest ra, - I 

Another innovation is an improve- 1 
mem in tonal blend achieved by] 
the addition of the stringed bass to 
the usual tuba system, Director Low] 
said. 

The resulting organization be¬ 
comes not a band, which is essen¬ 
tially military in character* but al 
concert or symphonic band, whose I 
aim is the serious interpretation of| 
L bwhile musical literature* Low 






LETTER 


OLDTIME FIREMEN 

To the Editor of The Herald: It was 
with much interest that I read the 
article in your iaaue of November 27 
concerning the old volunteer hose 
companies of Rutland. 

I was particularly interested, due to 
the fact that 53 years ago two members 
of our family were with the “Nick- 
wackett Hose Company”, viz: George 
W. St. Louis of West Rutland and his 
brother Fred St. Louis, now* deceased. 

I have heard my father tell of some 
of the experiences in fire' fighting m 
those days and also of the parades 
and fun that was had at their musters. 

Many years ago a muster was held 
in St. Albans and my father arranged 
to have white pond lilies for each 
member of his company to wear in 
the parade. The lilies were kept in a 
wash tub at our house and the frag¬ 
rance was so extreme that it m?de 
some members in the house ill. so that 
the flowers were put out of doors for 
the remaining time. I believe the 
Rutland company made an extra nice 
showing in the parade because of 
these flowers. 

Those were the good old days, even 
though fire fighting was not what it is 
today. 

M. R. ST. LOUIS 

Bennington, Nov. 28, 1944. 


RECREATION PROBLEM.*. 




MARCH 30 , 1945. 


Eph •> 






Catherine A, Jaskoi, an cm- 
ploj p in Washington of the Am- 
munition Supply division. Field 
service. Ordnance, and daugh¬ 
ter of Mr, and Paul JaskoL 

of Center Rutland, has received 
a commendation and emblem 
for meritorious civilian serv¬ 
ice, The citation read In part, 
’‘Miss Ja&kot, through keen In¬ 
terest in her work, developed a 
method of direct shipments of 
ammunition which effected an 
appreciable saving in time, 
manpower, and material and 
contributed materially to the 
successful prosecution of the 
war effort,*' The citation was 
presented in the Pentagon 
building bv MaJ. Gen. Julian JC 
Hatcher, chief of Field service. 
Miss Jaskot has a brother, Pfe. 
Michael Javkof serving in Ger¬ 
mans- . 

















DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 18, 1945. 


Johnson Sisters, Twins, Awarded, 
Top Honors in Graduating Class 


Twin sisters have earned the topi 
honors in the graduating class ail 
Rutland High school, according iol 
an announcement by Frank W I 
Mayo* principal. The girls* Marilyn! 
K, and Carolyn L. Johnson, daughT 
ters of Dr* and Mrs, Earle Johnson! 
of Bellevue avenue, will be vale-[ 
dictorion and s&lutatorian, respec*| 
lively, at (he graduation exercises i 
the senior class on June 7* 

The girls' interest has not 
confined to learning, for in additioiJ 
to being members oI the National! 
Honor society, they have taken an] 
part in many olher schooi ac-j 
livittes. They have played basket-) 
•ball, field hockey and softball dur-[ 
ing their four years in school, and 
have been ardent skiers and horse-1 
ivomen. Both girls are active mem¬ 
bers of the "Mimes" club and! 
French club, of which Marilyn is| 
president. 

They are also interested in news-| 
paper and literary work, as Mari¬ 
lyn is a staff member of *Tibe Red| 
and While/' and Carolyn, of tlie| 
senior year book, 'The Talisman/ 
Marilyn attended the Green Moun-I 
tain Girls’ Stale in Montpelier last | 
June, and Carolyn was the district | 
winner in Lhe Edmunds memorial | 
essay contest 
The girls have taken an acuve I 
part in social activities during their I 
tour years at RHS and arc on the] 
committee for (he senior reception. 


MARILYN K. JOHNSON 
Valedictorian 


CAROLYN L. JOHNSON 
























ELAND DAILY HERALD, 


Rutland Girl 
Given Post At ! 
Wyoming Fort 

Miss Blanche Ch amberland of 
Hartford, Conn., daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Octave G* E. Ch&mberland 
of Elm street, has been notified of 
her civil service appointment to a 
post at Fort Francis Warren in 
Cheyenne, Wyo, She expects to 
leave Hartford about September 19. 


BLANCHE CIIAaiBEBLAND. 

Miss Chamberland will arrive to¬ 
day to spend the week-end and 
Labor Day holiday with her parents* 
She is a graduate of Rutland High 
school and the School of Oral and 
Dental Hygiene at Columbia univer¬ 
sity* For two years she has been 
employed by the Travelers Insur¬ 
ance company in Hartford as dental 
hygienist 












SEPTEMBER 13, 1944. 


Miss Raymond 
Will Teach In 
Germantown 


Miss M< Dorothea Raymond* 
da ugh ter of Mr. and Mrs. John H. 

I Raymond of 31 Higtv street has left 
j for Germantown* N* Y. f where she 
has accepted a position on the 
faculty of the Germantown High 
school, She will teach science* busi- 
j ness subjects and economics* 


MISS M. DOROTHEA RAYMOND-. 


Miss Raymond If a graduate of 
Mount Sh Joseph academy and of 
the Mount St. Joseph Music de¬ 
partment in this city. In June she 
received her B, S. degree cum laud 
1 from the college of St, Rose in Al¬ 
bany, N, V. She also received the 
gold key of Kappa Gamma PL the ui 
National Catholic Honor society* Injm 
college she was active in several ZJ 
[clubs and events* She was exchange 
ditor of the Rosadtrian, a member 
f the Glee club, the Dramatic club 
and the Verse choir. 


c £- .c - 















THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 8, 194?. 



Pvt, John W. Lovett, whose wife resides with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. William E, Lovett of 118 East street, is pictured here 
receiving a War Bond from Miss Juliette Carr at the Hollywood 
Canteen in Hollywood, Cal. Pvt. Lovell has Hirer brothers in the 
service: Janies of the Transportation corps, Joseph of the Marine 
corps and William of the Air corps. 












RUTLAND DAILY HERALD. TUESDAY MORNING. JUNE 13, 1944. 



SSss 


'** • a Ay 

* - Sff V*S 


Gen. Sir Bernard L. Montgomery, who announced last night 
that approximately 7O0§ prisoners already have been captured In 
the battle in Normandy, is shown above, standing beside the am¬ 
phibious "duck” from which hr landed In France to establish head¬ 
quarters. This is an official British War office photo. tAP Wire- 
photo via Signal corps radio.) 













.AND DAILY HERALD, MONDAY MORNING, OCTOBER U, 1944. 



Hr mid Photo 

Mr. and Mrs* Raymond Ponto of 77 Williams aired* who will celebrate their 18th wedding an¬ 
niversary tomorrow', are shown here with their IS children* Mrs* Ponto in the former Miss Marion 
Sulia of Malone, N, Y. The children, whose ages range from two months lo 17 years, are (!* to r,) Ray* 
mond* jr, ( 13; Morris, 17; Albert, 7; Theresa, 16; Mildred, 8; Aline* 14; Arnold* 5; Harold, IE, and Rid*, 
ard Front (with parents!; Margaret* 4; Barbara, two months; Marie, Z, and Robbv, IS months. Mu, 
Ponto is 34 years old and Ponlo is 44* 















I Mrs. Roosevelt Escorted In 
England By Colonel Creed 

[Former Rutland Man Accompanied President's Wife 
Three Days; Says in Letters Received Here That 1 
She Won Admiration of British People. 


How Mrs. Eleanor Boose'veU cap- 
I lured the hearts of the British peo¬ 
ple and won the admiration of all 
I who came to know her on her re- 
I cent visit to “the Island fortress" 
| Is revealed In letters from Col 
1 Richard L, Creed; son of the bte 
I Mr. and Mrs. James E. Creed of 
1 Rutland, received by his wife who 
Is living in Center Rutland, 


COL, RICHAltfJ 1* CREED. 

Col Creed accompanied Mr#. 
Roosevelt for three days on a tour 
of Scot land and was impressed by 
the stse and enthusiasm of the 
crowds which met her everywhere, 
in spite of the fact that no publicity 
was given her trip or itinerary. 

In bis own case, as among all 
those who served as her escorts on 
various trips, CoL Creed said, ac¬ 
quaintance with the presidents 
wife developed rapidly Into admir¬ 
ation. 

Col Creed Is a graduate of Rut¬ 


land High school and of Norwich L 
university, class of 1916. He has ! l 
been in the Army since Neve mb erf 
of that year. He was stationed fori 
nearly four years, from 1919 to 1923, 
with the American Army of Occu¬ 
pation In Coblenz and Cologne, Ger- 
many. 

Much of -the time since then he 
has been at Fort Riley and Fort; I 
Leavenworth* Kan. He graduated, 
from the Cavalry troop officers 1 1 
school at Fort Riley and from the I 
command and general staff school || 
at Fort Leavenworth. 

Last May on very short notice he | 
Was ordered to foreign duly from | 
id, it now ia I 
learned, has been since then in the | 
British Isles; 

in closing their For! Riley home II 
Mrs, Creed, who Is making her, 
headquarters “for the duration 1 ' 
with her sister. Miss Frances HuH- 
han, of Center Rutland, decided 
three dogs and a cat were one too 
many pete to move. She offered r 
one dog, a purebred German shop- I 
herd, to the “Seeing Eye" organ!-1| 
nation in Morristown, N. which I 
train# dog# to aid the blind. 1 

Just recently Mrs. Creed was|| 
much pleased to learn that her gift, 
“Nikki," now fully trained, has be* I 
come the Invaluable companion of | 
a young girl, enabling her to carry 
on a marly normal life In spite of I 
her blindness. 

CoL and Mrs, Creed have one son, j 
Richard, jr., who is u member of j| 
the class of 1944 at the Military 
academy at West Point, It is prob¬ 
able that he and his whole class 
will be graduated some time dur¬ 
ing the next year, Mrs. Creed says, I 
on account of the speed-up In the i 
courses. 

CoL Creed has a sister. Miss Mar¬ 
guerite Creed of Proctor, Who is| 
now helping at the Navy war In- 
slru-clion center al Dartmouth ftsJ-jl 
lege, and a brother, Col John E. 
Creed, U. S. A„ retired, now in toil 
important war job in the San Fran-| 
cisco area. 















THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 28, 1944. 



t. S. Army Photo, 


"Best two out of three, winner take all and the loser, poor 
fellow, must stay in Italy and wait bis turn," Is what the loth 
AAF Headquarters says of this picture. Tossing a coin for rota* 
tion furloughs is what the hoys figured out to he the best way to 
decide who would go home. Left to right are S/SgL Gerald 
Lapp ley of Grand Rapids, Mich., the unfortunate loser, S/Sft, 
Albert D, Paul of 35 Howe street,, RUTLAND. YT„ the man who 
tossed the coin and acted as judge of the contest, and Cpt. Robert 
Crockett of South Miami. Fla,. the happy winner who will get a 
chance at "foreign duty" in the United Stales. The coin used was 
an American quarter and according to CpL Crockett, "that coin 
will be roy pme possession." 











a 

D 


Passenger Hurt 
S As Truck Hits 



t A man was injured and two motor 
, vehicles were slightly damaged in a 
_ collision which occurred on Center 1 
I street, between Wales and Mer¬ 
chants How* yesterday about noon, 
„ According to police records, an 
e Army truck was parked in front 
E of the recruiting station on the south! 
side of Center street when an east- 
bound truck* operated by Fred 
Perkins of Spruce street "hooked in¬ 
to the rear of it. The commercial 
truck is owned by Harry M. Porter 
™ »*■ c - t7, * ruckin * contractor. 

At the time of the accident, Harold 
H, Gcnnette of State street was rid¬ 
ing in a standing position at the 
rear of the Porter truck* He was 
tossed into the air and fell upon! 
the concrete pavement police re¬ 


ported. 












RU 



Miss Joyce Plunkett, daugh¬ 
ter of Mr* and Mrs. Henry At¬ 
kinson Plunkett of Grove street, 
Will be married to City Attor¬ 
ney Milford K* Smith of Grove 
street tomorrow night at S 
o'clock at the Congregational 
church. Attorney Smith Is the 
son of Mrs. Rae E. Smith of 
Grove street and the late Ilr. 
Smith. 

















Victory Ship Rutland in Pacific, 

Father of Crew Member Writes 

—-—-- 


m 

i * 

The name* Rutland* means 
something to E. A. Patterson of 
Medford, Mass., aside from the 
fact that as a hardware mer¬ 
chant he deals in merchandise 
made here. In placing an order 
with the Rutland Fir^ Clay 
company for one of its products* 
he wrote: 

'‘While 1 was writing your or¬ 
der. the name of Rutland stood 
out so I am writing this note, 

I do not know whether it is 
publicly known in your city but 
there is a Victory ship named 
after Rutland Vt. • • • The 
third mate is my son. Earl Pat¬ 
tern n of Medford. He went to 
Portland Ore., where the boat 
was built and sailed on it from 
San FraocjS':ti in May and they 
now are on the Pacific some- 

where past # Pearl Harbor. I had 
a letter last week and they were 
still out on the water. 

“1 happened to be writing to 
him and the two Rutland* came 
to my mind so I wonder if this 
was a little news that would 
be of interest Rutland being 
the name of a boat helping to 
end the war as soon as possible/' 

The 10.800-ton 455-foot ship* 
'‘Rutland Victory/’, was design¬ 
ed by the Maritime commission 
as one of a fleet of similar ships 
and was built by the Portland, [ 
Ore., Ship Building corporation 
from whose ways it was launch¬ 
ed last May, the ceremony being 
witnessed by three Vermonters 
on special invitation of the 
builders extended through the 
Rutland Chamber of Commerce. 













Service Flag With 30 Stars 
Dedicated At Jewish Center 


A service flag with 30 stars rep 
resenting Jewish men and women 
of Rutland and vicinity who have 
entered the armed services was 
dedicated last night at the Rut¬ 
land Jewish center. 

Rabbi Max Weine presided at the 
dedication and speakers included 
Maj. Charles H. Roberts of the 
Army Recruiting station and Capt 
Stanley A, Ward, who has succeeded 
Capt Ireland Bahnister as head of 
the local Marine recruiting head¬ 
quarters here. 

Lieut Josephine Springer, WAAC, 
also of the local Army station, dis¬ 
cussed life In the women's branch 
of the service. 

The 30 stars on the flag were ar¬ 
ranged in the form of the six- 
pointed Star of David, One of the 
stars represented Lieut May Adel- 
man, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, 
Joseph Adelman, of State street 
who is an Army nurse on duty 
• somewhere in the Pacific” 

The program concluded with the 
pledge of allegiance and the sin* 
mg to'the Star Spangled Banner. 

Represented on the flag were the 
following Jewish persons in service 
from this area: 

May Adelman* Norman Adelman, 
Joseph Biumberfi, Arthur Dick, Ber- 
nard R. Dick, Isadora I. DordicKg 


Max Fein berg, & w. Fishman, 
Irving Gelvan, Burton Ginsburg, 
Sidney Ginsburg, Harold E, Kan 
ton and Raymond Kantor, 

Also Bernard Kaion, Philip Ka- 
zon, David Lorton, Hyman Lash, 
Irvmg Lash, Daniel Meyers, David 
Miller, Lester Minker, Benjamin 
Mishel, George Pearson, George 
Ravlfc, Lanl Russell, Irving Slater, 
FhiUp Spahn, Alfred Swyer PhHip 
Weiss, Howard Wolinsky, Arthur 
Wolk and Morris Walk. 



















’LAND DAILY HERALD , FWD )RNING, FEBRlJ 

Library’s River St. ‘Station’ 

j 

Called Decidedly Successful! 


The first library "station”, estab¬ 
lished last summer by the Rutland 
Free Library in Reardon’s Grocery 
at 101 River street for the conveni¬ 
ence of residents of the western 
part of the city, has been a decided 
success, it has been announced by 
Muss Marion Humble, library direc¬ 
tor. 

A small collection of about 50 
books was sent to the shore eight 
month* ago. after discussion with 
several persons of that vicinity and 
with the Sisters of St. Joseph about 
suitable location for a library sta¬ 
tion in the neighborhood. The pro¬ 
ject was intended especially for 
mothers and children who might 
not find it convenient to walk to 
he library. The books have been 
changed several times, special re¬ 
quests have been filled and the cir- 
rulation has been five or six books 


a day, totalling about TO books In 
eight months. 

, ' ■ ' • dc services reft* . 

do red by the library in addition to] 
providing books, magazines and cir¬ 
culars during the year have includ¬ 
ed the presentation of talks and] 
book exhibits at meetings of more j 
than 25 schools and organizations; 
the use and loan of recordings rang*™ 
ing from Gregorian chants for use 
by the Mount St. Joseph Music de¬ 
partment to songs of the Bed armyf 
and Russian folk songs for Friends I 
in Council; Spanish language rec¬ 
ords for study at the library and by 
the Fittsford High school Spanish 
class; exhibits o! books, pictures, 
paintings of the Mid-Vermont Ar¬ 
tists: prize winning pasters, arts and 
crafts in the Library Recreater L 
room and the use of the library fori 
ea by mai 

organizations. 1 















RU‘ 


Pfc. DiBiere, 
22, Musician, 
Dies in War 


Pfc. Michael J> DiBiere, 22, 
known to dance patrons and audi¬ 
ences in this area for several 
months as a guitar player and 
singer with a cowboy band, Jimmy 
Miller and His Saddlemates, was 
killed in action in France,on Jan¬ 
uary 14, friends in Rutland have 
learned. 

pfc, DiBiere was wounded in 
action in the invasion of France 
when his right ankle was hit by 
Nazi machine gun fixe* He was hos¬ 
pitalized for eight months in Eng¬ 
land and was awarded the Purple 
Heart* He served as a rifleman in 
an infantry unit 

Pfc, DiBiere entered service in 
this city in April, 1943* He was a 
native of Amsterdam, N, Y„ and his 
nearest relative is an aunt who lives 
in Troy, N. Y* In addition to being 
a musician with the Rutland band, 
he was entertainer for five years 
over radio stations in Ttoy, N* Y. 
Piattsburg, N* Y„ St. Albans and 
Waterbary* 







TLAND DAILY HERALD, THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 17, 1945. 


Soldier’s Letter, Valid As 
Will, 1st Since Civil War 


Desire Expressed by Brattle- 
boro Serviceman in Note 
to Parents Allowed in 
Probate Court Here. 


A letter* written by e soldier in * 
war service to his parents \n Brat- 
tlcfooro, stating that he intended to ] 
make a will* bequeathing them 
$1000, has been allowed by Prob- 1 
ate Judge George F. Jones of this j 
city as a valid will. It is believed 
to be the first instance of the kind 
since the time of the Civil war. 

The ground on which Judge Jones 
based his decision is that the young 
man* Lt, Stuart J, Wheel den, jr., 
formerly of Brattleboro, was a "sol¬ 
dier in actual military service’’ 
within the meaning of Section 2753 
of the Public Laws of Vermont, 
sometimes referred to as the “sol¬ 
diers' and sailors' law " 

Lt Wheelden enlisted m Com¬ 
pany I, 372d Vermont infantry of 
the 43d division in March, 1941 and 
fought with the division in New 
Georgia, New Guinea and Luzon. 
He was appointed a second lieuten¬ 
ant on the field by the division com¬ 
mander, Mai, Gen. Leonard F. Wing 
of Rutland, and later served with 
Company 3 at Aitape, Dutch New 
Guinea. He was killed in combat 
on Luzon island in the Philippines 
on January 17* 1945 a-s result of 
enemy action. 


it was held a good military 
testament/' 

Judge Jones decreed that the 
remainder of Li Wheel den’s 
estate* after the $1000 is paid to his 
parents, be disposed of as if he had 
died without a will. The soldier’s 
widow, Louise C Wheelden of this 
city, becomes administratrix of the 
estate under the court’s order; 

Mrs, Louise Wheelden was rep¬ 
resented at the heading on the let¬ 
ter-will by Attorney James S. 
Abatiell, but no testimony was in¬ 
troduced in her behalf. Mr. and Mrs. 
S< J. Wheelden, sr„ also attended 
the hearing. 


In the meantime, while in serv¬ 
ice on New Guinea or some adja¬ 
cent area, he wrote his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. S. J- Wheelden. «, whose 
home is at 65 South .Mam street. 
Brattleboro, a letter m which he 
said, in part: "I'm going to make 
out a will tomorrow and I m going ■ 
to leave $1000 to you if 
happens to me. I don’t think it wiU 
but it’s liable to be anyone in war. 

The letter was dated November 
22 1044, and the envelope was post¬ 
marked "U. S. Army Postal Serv¬ 
ice. A.P.O., 43, Nov. 25, 1M4. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wheelden received two 
or three later, letters from Uieir 
soldier son but he made no refer¬ 
ence in them to the disposition of 
his personal estate. Lt. Wheelden# 
parents made diligent inquiry M 
o the existence of the suggested 
°ill the court found, but found 
icme and. inasmuch as the division 
itill jg in combat, there is nothing 
more that can be done. .. 

The court’s decree states furthei 
hat Lt. Wheelden was born on 

March 2, ISIS) and n ? qU t££ D 
made but that, at the time he 
wrote the letter, he was capable of 
making a will ’’and it woud seem to 
be well understood who was. the 
most deserving of his bounty. 

The decree continues, in part: 
‘The situation of soldiers in 
actual service renders it impractic¬ 
able for them to observe the statu¬ 
tory forms in making wills and the 
statutory provision is made in view 

of that fact. T , . 

m is not necessary m order to 
make a valid soldier’s will that dftc 
soldier should be in extremis. The 
statute was enacted for the heneii' 
of the able-bodied soldier as wel 
as for the soldier who is dying o! 
disease m* wounds. Under any othei 
interpretation the soldier who U 
about to engage in combat 
wholly deprived of the provisions 
of the statute. 

*The old cuvtT law was very 
indui^erffin respect to the wills 
soldiers and if a soldier 
wrote anything in bloody 
letters on his shield, or in the 
Hud of the field with his sword, 















Friend ly Natives 
Aid Strandedj 
Marine Private 


he 

ler 

}rd 

[ed 

it 

Ks. 

fin- 

Jon 

EC- 

the 

U- 


d. 

he 

on 

!>se 

« M 

v- 
Jte 
B 
re 
e 
U 
d 

ill 

es 

se 

in 

e 
Vy 
e 
•nt 

is 

id 


(Editor's Note: Charles McMurtryl 
Associated Press correspondent wfaq 
W9E badly burned in a naval engage-] 
meat oit The Solomons several week*) 
aao, now is back In action and hereJ 
with provides an eye witness deseripJ 
tion of the aid extended Americans byf 
friendly natives.) 

BV CHARLES McMURTKY. 

AN ADVANCE BASE IN THEl 
SOUTHWEST PACIFIC, Dec. 9| 
(Delayed! (/P),—A Marine private,! 
thrown into the sea when a Jap tor¬ 
pedo struck his cruiser, awakened* 
on a strange shore to find the hand! 
of a grinning native outstretched in| 
welcome. 

On Ihe native's chest was tattooed| 
the word "John. ,F But let the Ma-I 
nne r a 20-year-old private nick-I 
named “Phil 1 * from Detonti, Ark..| 
tell his own story. 

It begins at 11:30, the night of| 
November 30, Includes an exhaust¬ 
ing four-hour swim to Savo island 1 
near Guadalcanal, brief naps ini 
shore-side bushes, and a rescue by a I 
PT boat the afternoon of December! 
I, 

“I was tossed overboard, en¬ 
tangled in cables but was jarred I 
free—and luckily I had on a life! 
jacket, I could see the Jap fire! 
from a beach on Guadalcanal so 11 
started toward an island to the| 
north. As I swam l could feel ex¬ 
plosions but I didn't know w hail 
they were. It felt like barbed wire! 
snapping and like rifle bullets hit-f 
ling nearby. 

swam for arv hour, and then! 
began to hit 20 licks and rest 201 
licks alternately. After two hours! 
the pilchblack night seemed lighter I 
and i made out the island shore, <U| 
was Savo), 

"An oil-coated ladder drifted I 
near Just when 1 was ready to give I 
up from exhaustion. 1 grabbed it I 
and used it as a surf-board. The| 
current was so swift I seemed to I 
swim forward 10 feet and then drop 1 
\d back 10 feet, but eventually ij 
could touch the bottom. 

"I felt the island might be in Jap I 
hands so I crawled into bushes to I 
hide and rest. When I awoke I saw f 
someone coming so I crawled deep¬ 
er Into the bushes because 1 didn't I 
know whether it was a nalive or| 
a Jap. 


"He saw my tracks and wheeled 
toward the bushes. He discovered me 
and approached with outstretched 
band, grinning a welcome. I saw he 
was a native, and I was then more 
anxious to shake hands than he was. 
1 never was more glad to see any¬ 
one, He was about IS, very good 
looking, well-built, short, rather 
light-colored, wore only a blue 
breech-cloth, and had “John" tattoo¬ 
ed on his chest. 

‘He grabbed my arm and led mr 
to more natives, all of whom greet¬ 
ed me like a long-lost brother. I re¬ 
called l r d heard the Marines say the 
natives were friendly and I saw by 
the expression on their faces that 
they meant no harm, 

"I askedj 'Where are the Japa¬ 
nese?' 

* 'No JapV f they answered. 

'Then X asked, ‘Where arc the 
Americans?* 

11 'No Americans.* 

*1 was then taken to a native hut 
and given a bath. I was so Oil-cov¬ 
ered and dirty and tired that I let 
them bathe me. They'd found a bar¬ 
rel of kerosene washed In from a 
sunken Japanese ship and bathed off 
every black, oily spot. They brought 
a galvanized vessel of some sort fer 
me to bathe in boiled water. And 
they washed my clothes. 


y 
at 
■ *’ 

8; 


Soon I saw a sailor from my own 
ship. He already was bathed. We 
tried to figure out what had hap- 


The only thing civilized in the hut I 
was a pillow In a pillowcase and| 
there was only one of those. 

"Outside, the only sign of civili¬ 
zation were chickens and a can that 


period to the ship and what to doJ once held Australian biscuits. It 
We both were so exhausted we de-i was dated 1927. 
cided to rest four or five hours, | “About 2:30 in the afternoon, a 

(Their ship sank about 3 a. m-> ‘ native boy awakened us and point- 

"I found then that Lhe natives had ou t two FT boats approaching, 
brought a native doctor. He was, a native crawled out on a log and 
very old and very respected. His signalled them with brushes but 
word seemed to be law. He must 
have been the mayor. He treated 
my leg cuts with his own medicine, 
squeezed some kind of pulp on them 
that burned like fire. But I felt 
better and the medicine kept off 
the flies. 

"For breakfast they brought out 
bananas, four boiled eggs and a po¬ 
tato that seemed like a cross be¬ 
tween sweet and Irish. 'They serv¬ 
ed baked nuts of some kind as 
cereal. The eggs were fresh and 
delicious—the first I'd eaten in a 
long time, 

"As soon as we'd eaten the na¬ 
tives ganged around, and when we 
tried to let them krcoxv we were 
tired, they motioned toward a bam¬ 
boo hut with a thatched roof. The 
beds were Lwo layers of woven 
mats, hamp or bark laid on a table. 


the signal went unnoticed. 

"We then sighted an observation 
plane flying low, and I semaphored 
that 3 marine and a sailor were 
stranded. The plane signalled the 
boats which immediately came for 
us." 

"I gave a native iny Marine ring 
I'd seen him admiring and my 
clothes. The sailor gave a native 
his watch which had stopped be¬ 
cause of its long soaking In sail 
water.* 1 
















TLAND DAILY HERALD, WEDNESDAY MORNING, 


Nurse Tells of Hospital 
Work Under Jap Bombings 


Miss Louise Reiley, R. N., Aided Wounded Chinese 
Soldiers to Escape Nipponese Invaders; Describes 
Hardships of Internment After Pearl Harbor. 

"To be where the need is greatest 1 * is the desire of Miss Louise 
Reiley, R. N*, who returned to this country from occupied China nearly 
two months ago, the last part of the voyage on the Gripsholm. The nurse, 
who is visiting Deaconess Gertrude Stewart of Chestnut avenue, tells 
a story of the struggle of a hospital staff to survive and function amidst 
bombings, with lack of materials and staff members. 

;■ 4 'In August, 1938,” the nurse said, "we had to evacuate the Church 

General hospital at Wuchang and move to Hankow, the city across the 
river. Wuchang is the capital of the province and there were military 
objects in the city that the Japs bombed heavily during the months of 
June, July and August 1 ' 

'‘Though the hospital was never*-— 

hit directly, we suffered from the! 
bombs that were dropped on the! 
buildings nearby. The danger was so 


great we decided to evacuate the 
city, and moved across the river to 
Hankow. To do this we had to move 
everything out in the early morning 
and late at night, under the cover 
' of darkness. During those months 
in Wuchang there were at times 18, 

32, 50 and 96 planes overhead, 1 ' 

Miss Reiley pointed out that the 1ft 1942* 

only Japanese they saw in China J-Pj _ 

at that time was the military, "and I —--— 

we thought that they were the" 
scum of the earth/' she said, 

"When the Japanese occupied the 
city the Chinese suffered terribly. 

They were beaten on the streets un¬ 
til they didn't dare to appear out¬ 
side of their homes. The coolie class 
was conscripted/' 

Miss Reiley said that the Jap¬ 
anese insisted that everyone go by 
Tokio time, which she explained 
is similar to our Daylight Saving 
time. She said that one of the fav¬ 
orite tricks of the Japs was to ask 
a man on the street what time 
it was, if he took out his watch 
and gave anything but Toklo time, 
his watch was taken from him and 
the man was beaten. 

"People wonder how the Japanese 
can cover so much territory in 
China/' the nurse said, "however, 
the Chinese tactics are, 'let them 
take the -city, but let them try to 
hold. IV The Chinese guerillas give 
the soldiers no peace once they 
have occupied some territory." 

"When the Japanese army* enter¬ 
ed the city the Chinese army re¬ 
treated, leaving all of their wound¬ 
ed behind. We went out from the 
hospital and brought in all of the 
wounded. We had heard many 
stories of what happened to the 
Chinese soldiers who fell into Jap 
hands, so we burned all of the 
uniforms arid buried the ashes. 

Many times the Jap soldiers would 
come into the hospital and scrutin¬ 
ize all men patients. They never 
were able to pick out one soldier 
though. As the men recovered, they 
left the hospital and slipped through 
the lines some way, eventually 
managing to rejoin their 3 




Miss Reilly had one experience 
that has led her to believe that an 
army of women might surprise the 

"One day I was eating with some 
-i-Vifen p choose hoy-rush 
in and said that two Off our Chinese 
office boys were about to he beaten 
'by a Jap sentry. We didn't know, 
quite what to do about it, but 
asked the boy to take me to them. \ 
When we came to the corner I saw 
the two office boys on their hands 
and knees with a sentry standing 
over them with a bamboo club in 
one hand and a bayonet in the 
other. I walked up to bun and 
grabbed the club out of his hand, 
and threw it on the ground. Help¬ 
ing the office boys to their feet I 
turned and walked away with them 
without having said a word to the 

sentry* . _ _ _ ^ , 

Suddenly I realized what I had 
done, and I looked back expecting 
to see the sentry coming after me 
with the bayonet. Instead he was . 
still standing there—Jooking at us 
with his mou th open. He was amaz¬ 
ed to he -confronted by a woman 
in such a manner; in Japan the wo¬ 
men have no power whatsoever. 1 

With Pearl Harbor, the nurse said 
that the Americans in occupied 
China lost all standing and priv¬ 
ileges* 1 

*We were interned in our homes. 
The hospital compound at Wuchang 
was sealed up by the Japs, as they 
said for protection lor the dura¬ 
tion* However, the duration lasted 
for two days. The compound was 
taken over by the army and they 
were stabling their horses in the 
hospital and other buddings, the 
last we heard." 


The only news the Americans 
received after Pearl Harbor' was 
German and Japanese propaganda. 

“On the night of December 8 the 
radios were taken from us. We 
were always being told of the hor¬ 
rible treatment that the Japanese 
received in the United States. They 
also took our cars and pianos, the 
latter we thought must contain some 
metal that they could use. When* 
ever our servants went out to buy 
some food for us the Japs would 
ask who the food was lor. If they 
heard that it was for Americans, 
often they would not allow it to 
be sold. Thus our servants were 
.forced to tell Me® many times. 

The price of food was very high, 
a 130-pound bag of rice was priced 
i at $150 in gold, which is quite a 
) bit for rice in China, The invaders 
'have taken everything from the 
Chinese in the effort to subdue 
them. They have forced the poor 
people to grow and use the poppy, 
in aii effort to undermine the 
morale." 


Tn regard to the Japanese soldier, 
the nurse said that they had -heard 
the Japs were not paid and that 
they were reimbursed by looting the 
homes of the Chinese. 

"In April we heard about the pos¬ 
sibility of an exchange and for 
awhile we thought it only concerned 
diplomats, I wanted to leave, hav¬ 
ing been there alnce 193-1* However, 
there were five Americans who de¬ 
sired to stay. The Japs must have 
wanted to get us all out of the city 
because the five who wanted to 
stay were forced to leave. 

"When the hospital staff prepared 
to leave they were told the com¬ 
pound would be sealed. 

4t We knew what to expect from 
the Japs so we took all of the valu¬ 
able materials and instruments from 
the hospital and concealed them in 
the homes of Chinese friends. We 
heard that after we had left the 


Japs broke in to loot the place and 
were angry to find it empty” 

With 50 other Americans Miss 
Reiley traveled on a Japanese boal 
to Shanghai where they were guest: 
of the American Red Cross. Thej 
left Shanghai on June 29 on thi 
Conte Verdi and at Lourengc 
-Marques, East Africa, they met tilt 
Gripsholm and the exchange wa; 
made. 

Miss Reiley said that the trip tc 
this country was not especially ex 
citing, 

“One day we saw a burning ghi* 
with no lifeboats, members of th* 
crew or sign of life around It. 
guess they decided that it was at 
Axis ship, and that then© migh 
have been a naval battle there," 

The nurse said that she was ac 
qualnted with Dr. Clara Leach wh< 
was also working in occupied Chin; 
and who returned to this countr: 
on the Gripsholm. Dr. Leach is now 
at her home In Colchester. 

Miss Reiley's home is in Pitts 
burgh. Pa, 

"I plan to go to a hospital h 
Pittsburgh and take a refreshe 
course. From there l s ll go to a has 
pita! in Alaska*" 

































tu n-jViti 


Miss Reilly had one experience 
that has led her to believe that an 
army of women might surprise the 
Japs, 

4 One day I was eating with some 
wh-m ^ Chtner* boy nj=V -- 
In and said that two of our Chinese 
office boys were about to he beaten 
by a Jap sentry* We didn’t know 
quite what to do about It, hut I 
asked the hoy to take me to them. 

When we came to the comer I saw* 
the two off ice boys on thdr hands 
and knees with a sentry standing 
over them with a bamboo club in 
one hand and a bayonet in the 
other. I walked up to him and 
grabbed the club out of his hand 
and threw it on the ground. Help-j 
ing the office boys to their feet 1 
turned and walked away with them 
without having said a word to the 
sentry. 

Suddenly I realized what I had 
done, and I looked back expecting 
to see the sentry coming after me 
with the bayonet Instead he was 
still standing there—looking at us 
with his mouth open. He was amaz¬ 
ed to be confronted by a woman 
in such a manner; in Japan the wo- 
T#b whatsoever;' 

With Pearl Harbor, the nurse said 
that the Americans in occupied 
China lost all standing and priv¬ 
ileges. 

“We were Interned in our homes, 

The hospital compound at Wuchang 
was seeled up by the Japs, as they 
said for protection for the dura* 1 
tlon. However, the duration lasted 
fur two days. The compound was 
taken over by the army and they 
were stabling their horses in the. 
hospital and other buildings, the I 
last we heard/* 

I The only news the Americans] 
l| received after Pearl Harbor 'was! 

[I German and Japanese propaganda*! 

| "On the night of December S thel 

■ radios were taken from us. Wei 

■ were always being told of the hor-l 
llriblt treatment that the Japanese! 

■received in the United State?, They I 
false took our ears and pianos, the! 
fatter we thought must contain some! 

ImeUl that they could use. When- 1 
lever our servants went out to buy I 

some food for us the Japs would I 
ask who the food was for* If they I 
heard that it wa® for Americans,! 
often they would not allow it to I 
be sold. Thus our servants were! 

I forced to tell lies many times, l 
Th* prLee c ,i I*>.>d was v er y high, | 
a 130-pound bag of rice was priced I 

lat SlijO in gold, which is qu£t*#v _ 

1 ” Tice m China. The iny^ers j aDg Wt* f f _ , , .. 

feit CSSf Jthfi; * 

in an effort to undermine *th>' of thT ' In wherejhey were gue: 

ne the Red Cross, Th 

- on Jun « 29 on tl 

To retard to the Japanese soldier 'MwLr/ ."*? a t Loureoj 
ftee flitfse said that they had hSS iSsSfe ^ Africa. they met tl 

[homes of the Chinese. a£ “*LffS2? IUv *M* tilat the ' 

Tn b SS ‘ b ° M “>< |X y ' W "“ ly » 

I™*« to'Kt m tifSS S u g. h S'|' h ". b "“'* Syal'baaifs;,”." 1 

i when the hospital *tafT , jwwi 3 . working m occupied ChTn 

to leave they were told thl anc * returned to th : s count- 

tbe «»-SjGdpshota. d£ L«ch 

the hospital and 00 ^^^®“ ( "* P 1 ^ to go to » hospital j„ 
h * " mes Of Chines, fnendt w Pl£tsbur ? h *nd take a refresher 

b ' M “•« W m Site 








the water, can give some in LereS 


Syndicate, Inc.) 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The Herald welcome* letters from reader* an all timely subjects, Writer* must in- 
dud* their name* and addressee, but these will be withheld, from publication an request* 
Please make sour letter* abort. 1 - 


ANTI-LABOR LEGISLATURE? 

To the Editor of The Herald; The 
anil-labor complex otf the 1045 Vermont 
Stale Legislature is another shameful 
public demonstration of the industrial 
backwardness of Vermont. It Ji a 
public confirmation of what I have 
already demonstrated that economical¬ 
ly speaking Vermont is comparable 
only to the anti-union states of the 
South, II has been publicly stated 
(and never denied! that Vermont's 
standard of wages Is the lowest in New 
England, Now our duly elected rep¬ 
resentatives in Montpelier want to 
publicly profess before the Nation 
their sympathy with the union busting 
tidies of the southern gentry. 

Citizens of a state or country have a 
natural right to form freely associa¬ 
tions of their own choosing. The Stale 
has no moral right to interfere with 
the exercise of this right by its citi¬ 
zens unless it can be shown that wide¬ 
spread abuse has made restictlve legis¬ 
lation imperative. Can these anti¬ 
labor legislators prove the existence 
of such abuse in Vermont? Can they 
give evidence that the workers of Ver¬ 
mont desire and need to be “protect¬ 
ed" from their own union officers? If 
so, the burden lies upon them to make 
such evidence public. 

Vermont was the only state in the 
East that did not send a representative 
to the Eleventh National Conference 


on Labor Legislation called by the 
Secretary of Labor in Washington a 
few months ago. A report on this 
conference says that “the fruits of 
these annual conferences of Governors' 
representatives from Stale labor de¬ 
partments and organized labor are im¬ 
planted today in the labor laws of 
many States and are reflected in the 
hearts of millions of American workers 
who enjoy the benefits of these laws/' 
Apparently we missed oul on some¬ 
thing by not having our representative 
there. 

Yours truly, 

REV, EDWARD J. GELJNEAU 
Fair Haven. Feb. 22, 1945. 


flea lion from the draft board itself, 
rather than arising in the morning and 
seeing it staring them in the face from 
the pages of your paper. Some boys 
leave home before reading the paper 
and do not return until night* which 
leaves a very long day for the "little 
woman" to worry all by herself. What 
say T can you forsake a little "Timely 
news'. to give these fellows and girls 
a break? 

Thanks. 

WILLIAM N. WARD 

Rutland. Feb. 23. 104ft. 

(Editor's Note; Publication of re- 
classifications in advance of receipt of 
notice by the regislrant It the ex¬ 
ception rather than the rule. Release 
of ihe list is withheld until itfter no¬ 
tices are mailed,) 


DRAFT NOTICES, 

To the Editor of The Herald; May 
I make a suggestion? The young men 
in the 2#-2G age group have had con¬ 
siderable buffeting by directives from 
Selective Service- More than once 
many of them have had to readjust 
their lives, and their families to differ¬ 
ent situations as they occur, which 
has seemed qulle frequent. 

Today, when many of these fellows, 
having only recently received a 2-A 
or 2-B classification which we’ll say Is 
good until May, are suddenly being re¬ 
classified I-A, ii would seem lo me 
that the Herald should have the cour¬ 
tesy to let them received their noil- 


125 YEARS AGO 

LAID ON TABLE. 

"I think," said a facetious farmer, 
"that I would make an excellent mem¬ 
ber of congress. I am frequently using 
this sort of language— The other day 
1 received two bills from my creditors, 
accompanied with requests for imme¬ 
diate payment. One of the bills 1 or¬ 
dered ‘laid on the table,* the other to 
fee paid + lbar, day six months.’ 

"Congressmen are supposed to bi 
our wisest men of the country Why 
not follow the examples they seiF 









Business 
Block Sold! 


122-24 Merchants Row Bought 
by Macau ley at Reported) 
Price Near $45,000. 


Severed well-known landmarks in 
Rutland are involved In real estate 
transfers recorded irv the office of 
the city clerk* the list being headed 
In value by sale of the so-called 
"Sawyer block** at 122-24 Merchants 
.Row; at a price said to be about 
$45,OCX), to Albert W. Maciutley, who 
Is presidaM of Jam sic, Jnc M in which 
he id associated with James S, Aba- 
fciell. 

Its first floor now being remod¬ 
eled for use as a bus station in the 
north half and &s tm addition lo the 
*22 Center Street' 4 restaurant now 
operated by Muc&uley, in the south 
half* the Merchants Row property 
was sold by the Rev, Frederick S. 
Arnold of Brandon, retired Episco¬ 
pal rector, who hud purchased it 
only last Marrfi. 

Previously owned and occupied 
by the Norcross^Eldridge company, 
the property has a Imnlage of 45 
feet. The building had been occu¬ 
pied for 67 yean by Hi A. Sawyer & 
company until August, 1942, when 
purebred by the N<mraas*Eldrldge 
concern which since last spring has 
moved to the former Burdltt Emb¬ 
ers 1 building on Evelyn street 

Macaulay last night announced 
plans to uae the south half of the 
flnrt floor as "the most modern rea- 
tauranl in Vermont," with counter 
service, soda fountain, and connec¬ 
tion through to the Center street 
restaurant. The Vermont Transit 
company Is leasing the north half 
of the floor for a new terminal 
here and the entire first floor front 
jl being mod smiled, Eventually the 
front Of the Whole building will re¬ 
ceive similar treatment, Macs uley 
stated. 

The second floor ns leased to, 
and has just been remodeled for, 
the Onjc club, a social organiza¬ 
tion of Shrinem and negotiations 
are under way, Macaulay staled, to 
bring a New York concern here to 
conduct light manufacturing, em¬ 
ploying 30 or 00 people, on the third 
floor. 

Two well-known old family 
houaes, which have also changed 
hands, according to deeds filed 
with the city clerk, are the Ball 
home ,*n Grove street and the for¬ 
mer Wood fin home on Pleasant 
street. 

Dr. Clarence F. Ball and Mary M 
Ball have deeded the Grove street 
properly to Delroar F and Marie 
R B«rah, while the long-vacant 
Woodflti house at 46 Pleasant street 
has been purchased by Elmerlm* B 
Bove from Jolm D. Woodfln of 
Cambridge. Mas?;,, Frances E, W. 
While of Brookline, Mass., Dorothy 
G. Woodfln of Rutland and Alice T, 
W. Branllere of New York, 

Other property transfers of recent 
record are as follows: Bernard and 
Thelma Murphy to Kenneth E, and 
Erie»flji B. Stratten* property on 
[Jackson avenue; and Joel H Car¬ 
rier to Joseph A, and Ruth A, Beau- 
[champ, property on Lincoln avenue.